Robotics : All Tech Considered Robotics
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Robotics

Starship Technologies' delivery robots, which can be found traveling the sidewalks of Washington, D.C., get smarter the more they drive — learning about sidewalk and traffic patterns with every trip they take. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Hungry? Call Your Neighborhood Delivery Robot

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When a person places a finger in the slot on the left, the robot uses an algorithm — unpredictable even to its creator — to decide whether to prick the finger with the pin on the end of its arm. Alexander Reben hide caption

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Alexander Reben

A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

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W. H. Richards and A.H. Reffell built Eric in 1928. The Science Museum estimates it will take expert roboticist Giles Walker three months to reconstruct him. Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images hide caption

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Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

London Museum Hopes To Reboot Eric, Britain's First Robot

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The robotic skull of a T-600 cyborg used in the movie Terminator 3. Eduardo Parra/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Parra/Getty Images

Weighing The Good And The Bad Of Autonomous Killer Robots In Battle

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Fernando Boiteux tosses Emily, a remote-controlled lifesaving device, into the waters off the shore of the Greek island of Lesbos. Boiteux, an assistant fire chief from Los Angeles, is helping train Greek first responders to use Emily. Joanna Kakissis for NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis for NPR

How A High-Tech Buoy Named Emily Could Save Migrants Off Greece

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UmmaGawd (Tommy Tibajia), a pilot in the Drone Racing League, flies his quadcopter in an abandoned power plant in New York. The Drone Racing League hide caption

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The Drone Racing League

A Video Game IRL: Drone Racing League Aims To Be NASCAR In The Air

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Google's self-driving prototype car can be found cruising the streets near the Internet company's Silicon Valley headquarters to test programming responses to a variety of situations. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

A row of Google self-driving Lexus cars at a Google event in Mountain View, Calif. The cars use sensors and computing power to maneuver around traffic. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

How Close Are We Really To A Robot-Run Society?

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The robot from Florida-based Team IHMC Robotics takes a tumble as it tries to walk over rubble. This team came in second place and won a $1 million prize. DARPA Robotics Challenge hide caption

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DARPA Robotics Challenge

At DARPA Challenge, Robots (Slowly) Move Toward Better Disaster Recovery

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The German service robot Toomas was designed to welcome customers and help them find items in a store. Joerg Sarbach/AP hide caption

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Joerg Sarbach/AP

Attention White-Collar Workers: The Robots Are Coming For Your Jobs

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Shoppers view and take photographs of humanoid robot "Chihira" at the information reception desk of Mitsukoshi department store in Tokyo. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

She's Almost Real: The New Humanoid On Customer Service Duty In Tokyo

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