Behavior : All Tech Considered Tracking how technology — from the simplest tools like pencils, to the most advanced artificial intelligence — is affecting and changing our individual habits, but also group behavior and society.
All Tech Considered

All Tech Considered

Tech, Culture and Connection

Behavior

Jenn Liv for NPR

An Artist Sees Data So Powerful It Can Help Us Pick Better Friends

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Jenn Liv for NPR

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

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For two years, Hawkins let his app guide him around the globe, including a stop in Gortina, Slovenia. Courtesy of Max Hawkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Hawkins

Eager To Burst His Own Bubble, A Techie Made Apps To Randomize His Life

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A Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police officer wears a camera during a news conference in 2014. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Scientists Hunt Hard Evidence On How Cop Cameras Affect Behavior

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Digital lenders are pulling in all kinds of data, like purchases, SAT scores and public records. TCmake_photo/iStockphoto hide caption

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TCmake_photo/iStockphoto

Will Using Artificial Intelligence To Make Loans Trade One Kind Of Bias For Another?

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'Irresistible' By Design: It's No Accident You Can't Stop Looking At The Screen

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These days, talking to a bot is commonplace. Think Siri, or your chatty banking app. But you wouldn't talk to your toaster like you talk to a friend — unless your toaster had a great sense of humor. RYGERSZEM/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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RYGERSZEM/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Michael Czaplinski has been unveiling the magic of computers for more than a quarter century. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

'Never Trust Magic': Tips From An IT Guy

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Liam Norris/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

At This English Bar, An Old-School Solution To Rude Cellphones

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Managing Your News Intake In The Age Of Endless Phone Notifications

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Can Big Data Help Head Off Police Misconduct?

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Concertgoers use their cellphones during a Fifth Harmony concert March 23, 2015, in New York. The company Yondr created a locking pouch to hold phones during performances, creating a "phone-free zone." Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Lock Screen: At These Music Shows, Phones Go In A Pouch And Don't Come Out

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