Alt.Latino: NPR Music's Program For Latin Alternative And Rock In Spanish Latino arts and culture explained with music and conversation, presented by Felix Contreras.

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Latinx Arts And Culture

From Havana to Miami (pictured here), protestors have chanted, "Patria y Vida," or homeland and life, a clever play on the revered, long-held mantra of the Cuban government: patria o muerte. Scott McIntyre/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott McIntyre/The Washington Post via Getty Images

We Excavate Cuba's Rallying Cry, 'Patria Y Vida'

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Gente de Zona's "Patria y Vida" (pictured, right: Randy Malcom in Miami) reclaims a slogan made popular at the birth of the Cuban revolution, "Patria o Muerte" (Homeland or Death), 62 years ago. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Actress Adelina Anthony and actor Mateo Ray Garcia in The Daily War, part of PBS's Latinx film series. Silvia Lara/Courtesy PBS hide caption

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Silvia Lara/Courtesy PBS

Indie Film And Latinx Reality

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Puerto Rican superstar Rauw Alejandro's "Todo de Ti" has taken the Latin pop world by storm. Marik Curet/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Marik Curet/Courtesy of the artist

No Boundaries On The Island: The Music Of Puerto Rico

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A new documentary about Rita Moreno, Just a Girl Who Decided to Go for It, is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Alt.Latino Interview: Rita Moreno

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Melvin and his son, Nestor, were one family that was separated under former President Trump's zero-tolerance immigration policy. Nestor says he would have frequent nightmares about the separation. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

Lin-Manuel Miranda's In The Heights hit the silver screen on June 11, making a big splash in the world of Latinx media. Macall Polay/Courtesy of Warner Brothers hide caption

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Macall Polay/Courtesy of Warner Brothers

Lin-Manuel Miranda, Los Lobos And Tania León Post Their W's

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Participants in Aurelio Martinez's Garifuna music program in Honduras, dancing to their own beats. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

'Music As A Weapon': A Discussion About Garifuna Music

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Uruguayan artists Juan Wauters talks new music and his ever-evolving sound on this week's magazine show. Lucia Garibaldi/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lucia Garibaldi/Courtesy of the artist

A young boy from the dance group Sangre Nueva shows off his moves in La Maya, Santiago de Cuba. Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Eli Jacobs-Fantauzzi/Courtesy of the Artist

Bakosó: Cuban Grooves Meet Afrobeats

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Pedrito Martinez and Rubén Blades continue to defy expectations with the release of their two new albums. Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration

You Just Can't Peg Pedrito Martinez And Rubén Blades

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Four of the most influential Latin Rock albums of 1971. Anamaria Sayre/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Anamaria Sayre/NPR Illustration

Long Hair And Lowriders: Latin Rock In 1971

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Legendary Mexican Regional band Los Tigres del Norte keeping it real at Kingsbridge Armory in the Bronx. John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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John Reilly/Courtesy of the artist

Not Your Abuela's Music: A Deep Dive Into Mexican Regional Music

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Venezuelan-born rising starlet maye will perform at this week's LAMC. Fernando Osorio/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Fernando Osorio/Courtesy of the artist

Alt.Latino's LAMC 2021 Cheat Sheet

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Vocal Vidas perform at the SXSW Music Festival showcase presented by Soy Cubana: Music from the Movie during SXSW Online on March 19, 2021. Courtesy of SXSW hide caption

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Courtesy of SXSW

Ben Lapidus discusses his novel New York and the International Sound of Latin Music, 1940-1990. Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration

New York City's Influence On Latin Music

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Fans paying tribute to Selena in Texas. Jana Birchum/Getty Images hide caption

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Jana Birchum/Getty Images

Mon Laferte's new album is called SEIS. Mayra Ortiz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Mayra Ortiz/Courtesy of the artist

Speed Dating Through Spring's New Music

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Mexican jazz legend Tino Contreras celebrates his 97th birthday with a special concert from Mexico City. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the Artist

A 97-Year-Old Mexican Jazz Drummer's Latest Gig

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Omar Sosa's new album is An East African Journey. Massimo Mantovani/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Massimo Mantovani/Courtesy of the artist

Omar Sosa Takes A Journey To East Africa

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Two different authors explore Latin music history and its future. Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Renee Klahr/NPR Illustration

From The 'Cosmic Barrio' To 'Despacito,' Two Latin Music Books We Love

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