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Linda Ronstadt in the new film, Linda and the Mockingbirds. PCH Films hide caption

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PCH Films

Latinidad In The News

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Los Gaiteros De San Jacinto on the cover of its 2006 album Un Fuego de Sangre Pura. Jorge Mario Múnera/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways hide caption

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Jorge Mario Múnera/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways

Cumbia: The Musical Backbone Of Latin America

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Lido Pimienta's Miss Colombia received a Latin Grammy nomination for best alternative music album. Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the artist

We Look At The 2020 Latin Grammy Nominations

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Santana in 1970 (left to right): Carlos Santana, José "Chepito" Areas, Mike Carabello, David Brown, Gregg Rolie and Mike Shrieve. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

50 Years Later, Santana's 'Abraxas' Still Changes The Game

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From left to right, some of the Latinx figures we think deserve monuments: Ivy Queen, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Sonia Manzano and Anacaona. Rodrigo Varela; Ron Galella Collection; David Livingston; The Civilization, volume III, 1882/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodrigo Varela; Ron Galella Collection; David Livingston; The Civilization, volume III, 1882/Getty Images

Latinx Monuments We'd Like To See

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Graciela Iturbide's Mujer Ángel (Angel Woman), from 1979, was taken in the Sonoran Desert. Graciela Iturbide/Museum of Women in the Arts hide caption

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Graciela Iturbide/Museum of Women in the Arts

Graciela Iturbide, The Artistic Soul Of Mexico

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Devendra Banhart is one of two artists featured on this week's episode. Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist

Roots Grow Outward

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The Texicana Mamas (left to right): Tish Hinojosa, Stephanie Urbina Jones, Patricia Vonne. The trio's self-titled debut album is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

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Vocalist Gloria Estefan reimagines some of her classic music through a Brazilian lens. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Gloria Estefan: 'It's All About The Drums,' This Time From Brazil

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LADAMA is (left to right) Sara Lucas, Mafer Bandola, Daniela Serna and Lara Klaus. Their new album is called Oye Mujer. Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist

Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

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Carlos Vives leans into his Colombian roots on his latest album, Cumbiana. Andres Oyuela/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Andres Oyuela/Courtesy of the artist

Alt.Latino's Summer Music Haul

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Pete Rodriguez (center) on the cover of 1967's I Like It Like That, a pivotal boogaloo record, which has just been reissued. Courtesy of Craft Latino hide caption

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Courtesy of Craft Latino

Reclaiming Boogaloo

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In Tijuana, raised fists show solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images

The Afro-Latinx Experience Is Essential To Our International Reckoning On Race

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Colombian vocalist Lido Pimienta released one of our favorite albums of the year so far. Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the Artist

Alt. Latino Reflects On The Best Music Of 2020 (So Far)

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"I have found metal to be very descriptive of the horrors that we've lived in the Dominican Republic under dictatorships, [slavery]," Rita Indiana says. "Our history is a horrorosa." Noelie Quintero/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Noelie Quintero/Courtesy of the artist

Rita Indiana, La Monstra, Returns With 'Black Sabbath Dembow'

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Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd on assignment for Alt.Latino in Bogota, Colombia. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Alt.Latino's 10th Anniversary!

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Lila Downs and Gina Chavez join this week's Alt.Latino to talk about new music, but also the world right now. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

Lila Downs And Gina Chavez: Two Mujeres With Messages

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George Floyd's death by police force has sparked world-wide protest. Alt.Latino digs into it archives for an episode about protest music and its power. Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

From The Alt.Latino Archives: Protest Music That Inspires And Moves

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Natalia Lafourcade celebrates Mexican son jarocho on her new album, Un Canto Para Mexico. Manuel Zuñiga/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Manuel Zuñiga/Courtesy of the artist

Natalia Lafourcade Searches For The Soul Of Son Jarocho

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Undocumented workers are fighting for personal protection equipment as they perform work categorized as "essential" by the federal government. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

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Davíd Garza, the co-producer of Fiona Apple's Fetch the Bolt Cutters, talks about the economic challenges of the pandemic with a panel of guests. Felix Contreras/NPR hide caption

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Felix Contreras/NPR

How Some Indie Musicians Innovate And Improvise During Coronavirus

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