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Cuban vocalist Daymé Arocena (above) and Puerto Rican vocalist iLe are featured in this week's show. Pablo Dewin/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Pablo Dewin/Courtesy of the artist

From the archives: vibrant conversations with artists Daymé Arocena and iLe

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Vocalists Lila Downs (pictured), Li Saumet and Ana Tijoux are featured in this week's show. Marcela Taboada/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Marcela Taboada/Courtesy of the Artist

Celebrating Women's History Month with three powerful Latinas

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Vocalist Betsayda Machado's Afro-Latinx culture is explored in this week's show. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the Artist

From the archives: A deep dive into Afro-Latinx culture

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Alt.Latino host Felix Contreras interviews Amara La Negra over lunch. Marisa Arbona-Ruiz/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Arbona-Ruiz/NPR

Revisiting the work of two Afro-Latinx pioneers

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Residente (right) and Bad Bunny call for Puerto Rican governor Ricardo Rosselló's resignation in San Juan on July 17, 2019. Eric Rojas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Rojas/AFP/Getty Images

Speaking truth to power through music

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We try to understand how musical titans with incredibly different sounds and styles, like Celia Cruz and Selena, fit under the same 'Latin music' genre. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Alt.Latino and Code Switch: What is 'Latin Music' anyway?

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Rita Moreno, whose portrayal of Anita in the 1961 West Side Story earned her an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, attends the premiere of the 2021 remake. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

Looking back on the original 'West Side Story' and its impact on Nuyorican identity

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Puerto Rican pop star Rauw Alejandro was a top pick for Alt.Latino's Best Of 2021 panel. Rodrigo Varela/Getty Images for The Latin Recor hide caption

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Rodrigo Varela/Getty Images for The Latin Recor

Alt.Latino presents the best singles of 2021

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Spanish vocalist C. Tangana was a top pick for Alt.latino's Best Of 2021 panel. Arturo Holmes/Getty Images hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images

Alt.Latino looks back at the best albums of 2021

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The Paths of Pain, The Caife Label, Quito 1960-68 and Cantoras: Rural Folk Singers of Venezuela 1972-1983 Honest Jon's Records/Odelia Records hide caption

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Honest Jon's Records/Odelia Records

Voices from the past in Ecuador and Venezuela

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A Day of the Dead altar at a public shrine in the historic city center of Oaxaca, Mexico. Gabriel Perez/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Perez/Getty Images

Honor the Departed in Our Annual Sonic Altar

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Shakira onstage during her MTV Unplugged performance, recorded in New York in 1999 and released as a live album in early 2000. Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music hide caption

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Ignacio Gurruchaga/Courtesy of Sony Music

Presenting 'It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders': Pop music's 'Latin Explosion'

This week on Alt.Latino, we're featuring a special episode from our friends at It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. From the three-part series exploring crossover in pop music, the podcast takes a look at the "Latin Explosion" of the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Listen to our show

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We take a look at a few greats, old and new: Vicente Fernandez, Susana Baca, Cimafunk. Reanna Cruz/NPR Illustration hide caption

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Reanna Cruz/NPR Illustration

Alt.Latino And NPR News: Musical Profiles From Mexico, Cuba and Peru

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Pop-rock star Juanes (left) and Swedish singer-songwriter José González (right.) NPR Illustration hide caption

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NPR Illustration

Alt.Latino Unpacks the Latest Music News, Including Latin Grammy Drama

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Musician/activist Natalia Serna (aka La Muna) is featured in one of the stories from the border this week. Noelle Haro-Gomez./palaabra/NAHJ hide caption

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Noelle Haro-Gomez./palaabra/NAHJ

Humanity Has No Border on La Frontera

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Isabel Allende's (right) newest memoir is The Soul of a Woman, and Sandra Cisneros' (left) latest book is a bilingual tale of ex-pat Latinas in Paris, Martita, I Remember You/Martita, te recuerdo. Leonardo Cendamo/Getty Images / NPR Illustration hide caption

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Leonardo Cendamo/Getty Images / NPR Illustration

It's Lit! Latina Novelists On Living With (And Writing In) Two Languages

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From left, producer Sebastian Krys, vocalist Nina Diaz and musician Elvis Costello reimagined a 1970s classic album. Paul Moore/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Paul Moore/Courtesy of the Artist

Elvis En Español: 'This Year's Model' Reimagined

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Eblis Alvaraez (Meridian Brothers) and Iván Medellin (Conjunto Media Luna) have one of the albums featured this week. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the Artist

Alt. Latino's Fall Music Preview

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Ana Macho's "Cuerpa" is featured on this week's episode. YouTube hide caption

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YouTube

End Of Summer Rooftop Listening Party

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Gina Chavez, who was a Tiny Desk Contest judge in 2020, was overwhelmed by the Latin entries for 2021. Ismael Quintanilla III/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ismael Quintanilla III/Courtesy of the artist

Gina Chavez Picks Her 5 Favorite Tiny Desk Contest Entries

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We follow Latin Urban's trail from Panama to Puerto Rico to the world stage, including international superstar Bad Bunny. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Savage X Fenty

Encore: The Meteoric Rise Of Latin Urban Explained

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From Havana to Miami (pictured here), protestors have chanted, "Patria y Vida," or homeland and life, a clever play on the revered, long-held mantra of the Cuban government: patria o muerte. Scott McIntyre/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott McIntyre/The Washington Post via Getty Images

We Excavate Cuba's Rallying Cry, 'Patria Y Vida'

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