Latin Musicians Bring A Message Of Resistance To SXSW : Alt.Latino A spirit of protest motivated many Latin bands at this year's festival. Hear thoughts and music from some of the artists who performed, including Gina Chavez and members of Ozomatli and Fea.
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Latin Musicians Bring A Message Of Resistance To SXSW

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Latin Musicians Bring A Message Of Resistance To SXSW

Latin Musicians Bring A Message Of Resistance To SXSW

Latin Musicians Bring A Message Of Resistance To SXSW

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/521183648/521244311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Crowds gather to watch Calle 13's Residente at SXSW's All Latino Resist Concert. Adam Kissick for NPR hide caption

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Adam Kissick for NPR

Crowds gather to watch Calle 13's Residente at SXSW's All Latino Resist Concert.

Adam Kissick for NPR

Things are coming to a boil. If you listen closely, you can hear the chatter on the streets, in coffee shops or in meetings: Musicians are raising their voices to protest again.

I heard it when I was a teen during the Vietnam War, when musicians wore their passions on their sleeves in speaking out against an unpopular war. I've heard it at various times since then, coming largely from Latin America.

But now a new generation of artists is finding an audience for music with a message.

And that kind of music was on full display at this year's SXSW. In fact, it was highlighted at a large, free outdoor concert on the Thursday night of the international music festival, a showcase labeled a night of resistance. But it wasn't limited to that night. Throughout the week — in clubs, in auditoriums and on street corners — audiences were communing with bands to protest any number of social or political forces rearing up across the country.

This week we hear from the musicians themselves, including Gina Chavez, Dr. Shenka of Panteón Rococó and Phanie Diaz and Jenn Alva of Fea, about what's motivating them to speak out. And we hear their music — which is, after all, their final word on the matter.

Hear The Songs

Troker- 1919 Musica para Cine courtesy of the artist hide caption

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courtesy of the artist

Troker

  • Song: La Trampa
  • from 1919 Musica Para Cine
YouTube

panteon rococ tres veces tres courtesy of artist hide caption

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courtesy of artist

Panteón Rococó

  • Song: Ciudad de la Esperanza
  • from Tres Veces Tres
YouTube

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Song
Tres Veces Tres
Album
Tres Veces Tres
Artist
Panteón Rococó
Label
Ubersee
Released
2004

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ozomatli place in the sun courtesy of artist hide caption

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courtesy of artist

Ozomatli

  • Song: Burn It Down
  • from Place In The Sun
YouTube

fea by fea courtesy of artist hide caption

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courtesy of artist

Fea

  • Song: Feminazi
YouTube

Buy Featured Music

Song
Fea
Album
Fea
Artist
Fea
Label
Blackheart Records
Released
2016

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?