After The Storm: We Look Back On The Insurrection At The Capitol : Alt.Latino We take a break from the music for a Latinx perspective on the events that took place at the United States Capitol on Jan. 6.
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After The Storm

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After The Storm

After The Storm

After The Storm

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Hours after an insurrectionist mob stormed the U.S. Capitol. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Hours after an insurrectionist mob stormed the U.S. Capitol.

John Moore/Getty Images

Before we can get back to talking about music and culture, we have to address the insurrection at the Capitol. There have been countless hours of conversation on the news and social media, but this week we are going to look back and look forward from a Latinx perspective; it's a point of view that has been largely missing from the proliferation of reporting and analysis.

In this episode, we hear from Univision journalist Pablo Gato. Reporting from the Capitol on Jan. 6, he felt personally threatened by the mob both as a member of the media and for speaking Spanish while working the story.

We hear from associate professor Geraldo L. Cadava, who specializes in Latino and Latina history, to learn how the armed insurrection brought back dark memories to folks from Chile, Argentina, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Did you know that, in 1954, four Puerto Rican activists fired into the House of Representatives in the name of Puerto Rican independence from the U.S.? Five congressmen were hospitalized. We hear that story from our friends at Radio Diaries.

And finally, we get analysis from two NPR journalists who cover Congress and the White House.

We will get back to music very soon. But, for now, let's take stock of where we are in this country after a deadly assault on democracy and the many aftershocks that will continue for the unforeseeable future.