Analysis Analysis by NPR commentators, including Ted Koppel. Subscribe to our free podcast.

Nancy Pelosi could be restored as House majority leader if the Democrats do well in the midterms. Democrats have placed their chips as they try to unseat Republicans — but not on Russia red. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Activists march to the offices of Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand in New York City in September 2017, just before the start of Senate hearings on stabilizing the Affordable Care Act. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Special counsel Robert Mueller is required to submit a confidential report when his work is done, but the publication and circulation of whatever he files is not a sure thing. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh, seen here during his confirmation hearing early last month, has served on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals for 12 years. His tenure there offers some clues to how he'll handle the most controversial questions before the Supreme Court. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In this handout photo provided by the Supreme Court, Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., administers the constitutional oath to Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh as his wife Ashley Kavanaugh holds the Bible while joined by their daughters Margaret and Liza at the Supreme Court Building on Saturday in Washington, D.C. Fred Schilling/U.S. Supreme Court /Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fred Schilling/U.S. Supreme Court /Getty Images

Assistant U.S. Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers, left, speaks as U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania Scott W. Brady, 3rd from left, FBI Deputy Assistant Director for Cyber Division Eric Welling, 2nd from left, and Director General Mark Flynn, right, for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police listen during a news conference to announce criminal charges Thursday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, talks on a phone while walking to a room on Capitol Hill to read the report on the supplemental FBI investigation into Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

In one campaign ad about taking her kids to the doctor, Kentucky congressional candidate Amy McGrath nevertheless prominently features her military service. Amy McGrath for Congress/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Amy McGrath for Congress/Screenshot by NPR

Women Veterans Show Off Fighter Jets In Campaign Ads, But Also Their Minivans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/651950621/653825564" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Honor guards attend a flag-raising ceremony at Tiananmen Square in 2017. Under President Xi Jinping, China has ambitiously pressed its advantage almost everywhere at once. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
VCG via Getty Images

China Unbound: What An Emboldened China Means For The World

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/653312942/653494285" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dozens of protesters, including sexual assault survivor Mary Jane Maestras of Delta, Colo., demonstrate against the appointment of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Judge Brett Kavanaugh scowls as he testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill Thursday. Afterward, many observers felt he had revealed a partisan side never before seen from a Supreme Court nominee. Melina Mara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Melina Mara/AFP/Getty Images

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein departs the U.S. Capitol through a basement corridor after House and Senate lawmakers from both parties met in a secure room for a classified briefing about the federal investigation into President Trump's 2016 campaign, in May. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

Brett Kavanaugh Offers Fiery Defense In Hearing That Was A National Cultural Moment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/652239571/652449526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">