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The Supreme Court term that just concluded was a small taste of what is to come. In all, 13 of the cases decided by a liberal-conservative split, Justice Anthony Kennedy provided the fifth and deciding conservative vote. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement effective July 31. President Trump is planning to nominate a replacement soon. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Trump To Pick Kennedy Successor From List Of Conservative Judges

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President-elect Trump's acceptance speech was broadcast in Times Square in New York City after his 2016 election. Nearly two years later, the partisan divide grows even wider. Michael Reaves/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reaves/Getty Images

Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy, seen here in 2017, announced his retirement in a letter to the White House on Wednesday. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Supreme Court To Lose Its Swing Voter: Justice Anthony Kennedy To Retire

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First lady Melania Trump leaves Joint Base Andrews in Maryland wearing a jacket with the words "I REALLY DON'T CARE. DO U?" after her visit Thursday with migrant children who are being detained at the U.S.-Mexico border. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen speaks Monday during a White House news briefing about children being separated from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

When The White House Can't Be Believed

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President Trump's supporters cheer as he speaks at a rally in Nashville, Tenn., in May. While Democrats are fired up for these midterms, so are his voters. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Democratic members of Congress protest the Trump family separate policy. From left to right: Reps. Joseph Crowley, Luis Gutierrez, Pramila Jayapal, John Lewis and Judy Chu. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The inspector general's report has been hotly anticipated for months, but it does not conclude the saga over the Department of Justice, the FBI and the 2016 presidential election. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

A screenshot of a video shared on White House social media accounts. The video — a fake movie trailer encouraging cooperation between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un — was shown to Kim by Trump himself on an iPad toward the end of their summit in Singapore Tuesday. White House/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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White House/Screenshot by NPR

'Shaking The Hand Of Peace': Unpacking Trump's North Korea Movie Trailer

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