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The White House is seen reflected in a rainwater puddle on Friday, July 28, 2017 — amid very stormy times in Washington, D.C. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Could Trump Pardon Himself? Probably Not

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With President Trump in January: White House chief of staff Reince Priebus (from second left), Vice President Pence, chief strategist Steve Bannon, press secretary Sean Spicer and national security adviser Michael Flynn listen. Just six months later, only Bannon is still serving in the Trump-Pence administration. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Reince Priebus, seen in June, is out as President Trump's chief of staff. He will be replaced by Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

The Presidential Pardon Power: What Are Its Limits?

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President Trump's announcement that he wants to ban transgender people from serving in the military could mean a historic reversal in the Pentagon's long-term trend of lowering barriers to service. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

5 Unanswered Questions About Trump's 'Ban' On Transgender Troops

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On Tuesday on the Senate floor, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., called for a return to "regular order": the traditional legislative process, with more bipartisanship. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Senator John McCain leaves after a procedural vote on healthcare on Thursday, as the Senate was to vote on moving head on health care with the goal of erasing much of Barack Obama's law. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Blackwater Founder Backs Outsourcing Afghan War-Fighting to Contractors

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Russia Probe: Is The White House Trying To Discredit Mueller?

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This Week In Politics: President Trump's Power To Pardon

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House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Eric Swalwell, Rep. Joe Crowley and Rep. James Clyburn after Republicans withdrew their health care bill in March. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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