Animals Animals

Animals

Rohingya refugees use a mock elephant during a training session on how to respond to elephant incursions at the Kutupalong refugee camp. The massive refugee camp sits in what used to be a migratory path for elephants moving between Myanmar and Bangladesh. Munir Uz Zaman/Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/Getty Images

Why Elephants Pose A Threat To Rohingya Refugees

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Starr, a female bald eagle, looks over her eaglets in a nest along the Mississippi River in April. She is raising the three eaglets along with her two male partners, Valor I and Valor II. Stewards of Upper Mississippi River Refuge via AP hide caption

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Stewards of Upper Mississippi River Refuge via AP

Horses and jockeys charge toward the finish of a race on Santa Anita Derby day. The Derby was the most prominent event on a schedule that included 11 horse races. Tom Goldman/NPR hide caption

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Tom Goldman/NPR

23 Thoroughbred Deaths Force Santa Anita To Change. Will The Racing Industry Follow?

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The North American porcupine has a cute face, but it has upward of 30,000 menacing quills covering much of its body. The slow-moving herbivore uses them as a last-resort defense against predators. Lindsay Wildlife Experience hide caption

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Lindsay Wildlife Experience

One World Trade Center (WTC) stands in the lower Manhattan skyline as birds fly over the Hudson River in Hoboken, New Jersey, on Feb. 8, 2019. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Recent isotopic analysis of pig remains from several ceremonial sites in the Stonehenge area show that the swine and celebrants sometimes came from as far as what is now Scotland and Wales. Joe Daniel Price/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Daniel Price/Getty Images

Opinion: Can Stonehenge Offer A Lesson For Brexit?

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The United States Department of Agriculture announced on Tuesday it will discontinue a research program that involved killing thousands of cats. The agency has been under pressure to put an end to the program. USDA photo obtained through a FOIA request/White Coat Waste Project hide caption

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USDA photo obtained through a FOIA request/White Coat Waste Project

Cattle eating a mixture of antibiotic-free corn and hay at Corrin Farms, near Neola, Iowa. Their meat is sold by Niman Ranch. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Some In The Beef Industry Are Bucking The Widespread Use Of Antibiotics. Here's How

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Flamingos flock to Mumbai between September and April, but this year there are almost three times more birds than the amount that usually flocks to the area. Bachchan Kumar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Bachchan Kumar/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

More Flamingos Are Flocking to Mumbai Than Ever Before. The Reason Could be Sewage

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Pierre Comizzoli (right), reproductive physiologist at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, performs an artificial insemination on giant panda Mei Xiang March 29, 2019. Don Neiffer (left), chief veterinarian at the Smithsonian's National Zoo, performs for the procedure. (Roshan Patel/Smithsonian's National Zoo)/Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute hide caption

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(Roshan Patel/Smithsonian's National Zoo)/Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute

A chimpanzee hugs her newborn at Burgers' Zoo in Arnhem, Netherlands, in 2010. Over the course of his long career, primatologist Frans de Waal has become convinced that primates and other animals express emotions similar to human emotions. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Sex, Empathy, Jealousy: How Emotions And Behavior Of Other Primates Mirror Our Own

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Envy is a useful tool for social comparison. But sometimes, it can lead us to wicked places. Steve Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Steve Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Counting Other People's Blessings

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