Animals Animals

Animals

Because of their size, goliath groupers are nearly fearless and easy prey for fishermen and divers with spearguns. Sandra Edwards hide caption

toggle caption
Sandra Edwards

Florida Wants To Give Fishermen Another Go At The Great Big Goliath Grouper

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1039321982/1041266631" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A male Bougainville Whistler (Pachycephala richardsi), a species endemic to Bougainville Island. This whistler is named after Guy Richards, one of the collectors on the Whitney South Sea Expedition. Iain Woxvold hide caption

toggle caption
Iain Woxvold

Lions watch visitors from their enclosure on the opening day of the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC on July 24, 2020, after it closed due to COVID-19 outbreak in March. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

An axolotl photographed in Lake Xochimilco. Paul Starosta/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Starosta/Getty Images

A Lotl Love For The Axolotl

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1036590555/1037374821" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this undated photo provided by the Research Institute for Farm Animal Biology in Dummerstorf, Germany, a calf enters a "MooLoo" pen to urinate. Thomas Häntzschel/FBN via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Thomas Häntzschel/FBN via AP

In this image released by Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, the carcasses of dead white-sided dolphins lay on a beach Sunday after being pulled from the water on the island of Eysturoy, which is part of the Faeroe Islands. Sea Shepherd via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sea Shepherd via AP

Western lowland gorillas are seen in their habitat at Zoo Atlanta on Tuesday. Nearly all of the zoo's 20 gorillas have symptoms of having contracted the coronavirus from a zoo staff worker, according to zoo officials. Ron Harris/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ron Harris/AP

Various types of pufferfish are among those served as the gastronomic delicacy fugu. The paralyzing nerve toxin some of these fish contain is also under study by brain scientists hunting new ways to treat amblyopia. shan.shihan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
shan.shihan/Getty Images

Pufferfish Toxin Holds Clues To Treating 'Lazy Eye' In Adults

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1037096390/1037096391" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Macaques check out a camera in Galtaji Temple in Jaipur, India. Monkeys have been known to sneak into swimming pools, courts and even the halls of India's Parliament. One attorney told author Mary Roach about a macaque that infiltrated a medical institute and began pulling out patient IVs. Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Vishal Bhatnagar/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Monkey Thieves, Drunk Elephants — Mary Roach Reveals A Weird World Of Animal 'Crime'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1036701285/1037050798" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jontu, an Indian rhino, wanders around his enclosure at the Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquariumin in Omaha, Neb. Last week, an improperly closed gate allowed him to wander a little farther. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nati Harnik/AP

A Hungry Hungry Rhino Escaped His Pen At An Omaha Zoo To Munch On Grass

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1036922369/1036949258" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A starling sits in the cherry tree blooms along the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC. Researchers say some starlings has seen an increase in bill size. Paul Morigi/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Morigi/Getty Images

In this photograph taken in 2010, a Komodo dragon prowls the shore of Komodo island, the natural habitat of the world's largest lizard. Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Romeo Gacad/AFP via Getty Images
Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty

A new study examines whether or not dogs are able to understand the difference between a human's mistake versus active intent to withhold a treat. Os Tartarouchos/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Os Tartarouchos/Getty Images

Your Dog May Know If You've Done Something On Purpose, Or Just Screwed Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1032841893/1033170774" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A group of scientists have discovered a fossil of a now-extinct whale with four legs. This visual reconstruction shows Phiomicetus anubis preying on a sawfish. Robert W. Boessenecker hide caption

toggle caption
Robert W. Boessenecker

Sven Spichiger, Washington state Department of Agriculture managing entomologist, displays a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him in Blaine, Wash., last year. State officials said this week they had destroyed the first Asian giant hornet nest of the season, which was located near the town of Blaine. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

Morgan, a military service dog, stands on her hind legs for her handler before a news conference for HR 1448, Puppies Assisting Wounded Service Members (PAWS) for Veterans Therapy Act outside the U.S. Capitol on May 13. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images