Animals Animals

Animals

A screenshot of a video from the website Storyful shows an elephant walking through Butte, Mont., after escaping from a nearby circus on Tuesday. Storyful/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Storyful/Screenshot by NPR

University of Miami Marine Sciences student Lauren Hayes with her catch, a 7 or 8 pound mutton snapper, which was released and returned to its reef habitat more than 100 feet below the surface. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Allen/NPR

After catch and release, here's how to make sure reef fish survive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1242927954/1245367031" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Selkirkia tsering fossil found in a collection from the Fezouata Formation in Morocco. Javier Ortega Hernández/Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology hide caption

toggle caption
Javier Ortega Hernández/Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology

A two-spot octopus, like the type an Oklahoma family brought home as a pet. Angelina Komatovich hide caption

toggle caption
Angelina Komatovich

Terrance the octopus came to live with a family. Then she laid dozens of eggs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243710100/1243767379" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Lily Padula for NPR

In the womb, a brother's hormones can shape a sister's future

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1240906149/1244482458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A dog tries on eclipse sunglasses in London in 2015. Experts say pets don't need eclipse sunglasses — in fact, quite the opposite. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

The black-capped chickadee, seen here, is well known for its strong episodic memory. Dmitriy Aronov hide caption

toggle caption
Dmitriy Aronov

The "barcodes" powering these tiny songbirds' memories may also help human memory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198909635/1242956417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A mother humpback whale and calf are seen on the coast of Vitoria, Espirito Santo state, Brazil on August 22, 2023. Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images

Indigenous leaders want to protect whales by granting them legal personhood

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1242451885/1242451886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This combination of 2003 and 2006 photos shows a northern spotted owl, left, in the Deschutes National Forest near Camp Sherman, Ore., and a barred owl in East Burke, Vt. Don Ryan Steve Legge/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Don Ryan Steve Legge/AP

Dairy cattle feed at a farm on March 31, 2017, near Vado, N.M. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says cows in multiple states have tested positive for bird flu. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rodrigo Abd/AP

A person in Texas caught bird flu after exposure to cows that were thought to be ill

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241897770/1241998988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

You can ding-dong-ditch to save these fish

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241836246/1241836247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A researcher holds up a sandy De Winton's golden mole. Nicky Souness/Endangered Wildlife Trust hide caption

toggle caption
Nicky Souness/Endangered Wildlife Trust

This February 2021 photo released by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a protected gray wolf near Yosemite, Calif. California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP hide caption

toggle caption
California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP

French bulldogs have skyrocketed in popularity. Legislation being considered in New Hampshire could put rules on breeding ones with chronic breathing problems. Sarah Stier/Getty Images for Westminster Kennel Club hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Stier/Getty Images for Westminster Kennel Club

Bulldogs are prone to health problems. New Hampshire could limit their breeding

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241072309/1241269520" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A post-reproductive toothed whale mother and her son. David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research hide caption

toggle caption
David Ellifrit/Center for Whale Research

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

Across the animal kingdom, menopause is something of an evolutionary blip. We humans are one of the few animals to experience it. But Sam Ellis, a researcher in animal behavior, argues that this isn't so surprising. "The best way to propagate your genes is to get as many offspring as possible into the next generation," says Ellis. "The best way to do that is almost always to reproduce your whole life."

Most animals don't go through menopause. So why do these whales?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198909539/1240072805" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The French bulldog is America's most popular breed, according to the American Kennel Club. This one, Manny The Frenchie, attended Time Inc.'s 2017 PetHero Pet Party to benefit animals impacted by hurricanes. Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images for PetHero hide caption

toggle caption
Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images for PetHero

This photo provided by Tony Cavallaro shows his alligator, Albert, inside the custom enclosure he built for the reptile in his house in Hamburg, N.Y. The alligator was seized by the Department of Environmental Conservation in mid-March. Tony Cavallaro via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Cavallaro via AP

A cicada perches on a picnic table in front of Nolde Mansion in Cumru Township, PA in May 2021. New research shows that these insects urinate in a surprising way. Ben Hasty / MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ben Hasty / MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Scientists studied how cicadas pee. Their insights could shed light on fluid dynamics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1239529315/1239544522" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">