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Animals

Denise Herzing, dolphin researcher, at TED2013. James Duncan Davidson/TED hide caption

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James Duncan Davidson/TED

Denise Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

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TED

Suzanne Simard: How Do Trees Collaborate?

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New research shows that dolphins can learn foraging behavior from other dolphins. Sonja Wild/Dolphin Innovation Project hide caption

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Sonja Wild/Dolphin Innovation Project

Dolphins Learn Foraging Tricks From Each Other, Not Just From Mom

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The closer humans are to animals, the greater the opportunity for zoonotic spillover, where a pathogen jumps from animal to human. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

Osprey looking for alewives along the Sebasticook River in Maine. The removal of two dams has allowed migratory fish to return. Murray Carpenter hide caption

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Murray Carpenter

'One Of The Best Nature Shows': A River Transformed After Dams Come Down

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An artist's interpretation of a baby mosasaur hatching from an egg in the Antarctic sea. Francisco Hueichaleo hide caption

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Francisco Hueichaleo

Scientists Find The Biggest Soft-Shelled Egg Ever, Nicknamed 'The Thing'

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A swarm of desert locusts flies above trees in a Kenyan village. Hundreds of millions of the insects have arrived in Kenya, where they're destroying farmland. Ben Curtis/AP hide caption

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Ben Curtis/AP

Sea otters are tourist magnets--and voracious eaters. Not everyone is happy about their comeback off the coast of British Columbia. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

What Happens When Sea Otters Eat 15 Pounds of Shellfish A Day

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In parts of Virginia, West Virginia and North Carolina, cicadas will climb out of the ground for their once-in-17-year mating cycle. Scientists have dubbed this grouping brood IX. Stephen Jaffe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Jaffe/AFP via Getty Images

Penguins were allowed to waddle through the galleries of Kansas City's Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Both the museum and the Kansas City Zoo — home to the penguins — have been closed because of the pandemic. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. hide caption

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The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

With meatpacking plants reducing processing capacity nationwide, U.S. hog farmers are bracing or an unprecedented crisis: the need to euthanize millions of pigs. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Millions Of Pigs Will Be Euthanized As Pandemic Cripples Meatpacking Plants

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NPR

A Piping Plover glares at Jones Beach, Long Island, N.Y. A couple of these endangered birds have reappeared in Chicago. Vicki Jauron, Babylon and Beyond/Getty Images hide caption

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Vicki Jauron, Babylon and Beyond/Getty Images

Opinion: Endangered Bird Couple Returns To Chicago's Shore

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Vespa mandarinia, or the 'murder hornet', was first spotted in North America in 2019. Alastair Macewen/Getty Images hide caption

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Alastair Macewen/Getty Images

Does that chiffchaff sound chirpier to you? Ornithologists say the homebound are just noticing the sounds of birds more. Mathias Schaef/McPhoto/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Mathias Schaef/McPhoto/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Do Those Birds Sound Louder To You? An Ornithologist Says You're Just Hearing Things

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Sweet Farm animal sanctuary in Half Moon Bay, Calif., is offering Goat 2 Meeting: a virtual visit to meet the farm's animals. Pictured is Juno the goat. InkPoetry/Courtesy of Sweet Farm hide caption

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InkPoetry/Courtesy of Sweet Farm

Goat 2 Meeting: For Your Next Video Call, Invite A Farm Animal

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