Animals Animals

Animals

A dolphin's sense of echolocation allows it to coordinate efforts to hunt prey, see "through" other creatures and form three-dimensional shapes using sound. Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Roig/AFP via Getty Images

The human sensory experience is limited. Journey into the world that animals know

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K-9 Officer Teddy Santos watches Huntah as she checks a classroom at Freetown Elementary School. If she detects COVID, she will sit. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

'Smell Ya Later, COVID!' How Dogs Are Helping Schools Stay COVID-free

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The cover of Cylita Guy's children book, illustrated by Cornelia Li, Chasing Bats & Tracking Rats: Urban Ecology, Community Science, and How We Share Our Cities. Annick Press hide caption

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Annick Press

Freetown Elementary School students Mason Santos, left, and Mila Talbot, right, pet Huntah the dog after she finishes checking a classroom. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

Dogs trained to sniff out COVID in schools are getting a lot of love for their efforts

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A kindergarten student releases a turtle back into the wild at the Wetlands Institute in Stone Harbor, N.J., this month. Wayne Parry/AP hide caption

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Wayne Parry/AP

This kindergarten class has raised and set free 18 orphaned turtles

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Robert Brantley washes one of the 13 kittens he rescued along the side of the road in Pioneer, La., on Tuesday. Screen grab from video taken by Robert Brantley hide caption

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Screen grab from video taken by Robert Brantley

Past measures to tax farmers have met strong resistance, but New Zealand's climate change minister thinks it is a good start William West/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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William West/AFP via Getty Images

New Zealand announces world-first plan to tax cow and sheep burps

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A bison leads her calf through deep snow toward a road in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo., on Feb. 20, 2021. On Monday, a bison gored a 25-year-old woman in Yellowstone when she got within 10 feet of the animal. Ryan Dorgan/Jackson Hole News & Guide via AP, File hide caption

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Ryan Dorgan/Jackson Hole News & Guide via AP, File

The green boxes show portions of the audio spectrogram that artificial intelligence has identified as marine mammal calls. Ocean Science Analytics hide caption

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Ocean Science Analytics

A computer program designed to sort mice squeaks is also finding whales in the deep

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Green the Chow Chow sits in the grooming area at the 142nd Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show at The Piers on February 12, 2018 in New York City. The show is scheduled to see 2,882 dogs from all 50 states take part in this year's competition. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dog Breeds Are A Behavioral Myth... Sorry!

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Nate Sink, a firefighter based in the Missoula, Mont., cradles a newborn elk calf that he encountered in a remote, fire-scarred area of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains near Mora, N.M., on Saturday. Nate Sink via AP hide caption

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Nate Sink via AP

A herd of bison graze near the trail inside the bison range. Freddy Monares/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Freddy Monares/Montana Public Radio

Eva relaxes in a puddle in 2020. Erin Wilson hide caption

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Erin Wilson

Eva, the hero dog, beats back a mountain lion that attacked her owner on a hike

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Christian Cooper watches distant shorebirds at the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge in California. The National Geographic channel has announced that Cooper will host a series called Extraordinary Birder. Cooper was in the spotlight after a woman in New York City's Central Park called the police and falsely accused him of threatening her in May 2020. Jon Kroll/National Geographic hide caption

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Jon Kroll/National Geographic