Animals Animals

Animals

Rescued chickens gather in an aviary at Farm Sanctuary's Southern California Sanctuary on Oct. 5 in Acton, Calif. A wave of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu has entered Southern California, driven by wild bird migration. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

What we know about the deadliest U.S. bird flu outbreak in history

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Kevin Davenport, an aquarist and coral biologist, feeds krill to growing corals in a warehouse for growing and rehabilitating coral populations in Orlando, Fla., on Sept. 13. Zack Wittman for NPR hide caption

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Zack Wittman for NPR

Here is what scientists are doing to save Florida's coral reef before it's too late

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University of Pennsylvania Police Officer and K9 Uman, a black Labrador retriever trained in explosives detection, conducting a package search during a routine training exercise. Wise K9 Photography hide caption

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Wise K9 Photography

Bomb-sniffing dogs are in short supply across the U.S.

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tk Tracy Allard hide caption

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Tracy Allard

Give a round of app-paws for the 3 new breeds in the National Dog Show

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A twin engine turboprop airplane crashed onto the green of the Western Lakes Golf Club in Pewaukee, Wis. Tuesday morning. HAWS Staff/Humane Animal Welfare Society hide caption

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HAWS Staff/Humane Animal Welfare Society

The black flying fox is one of the bats in Australia that carries the Hendra virus — which sometimes spills over to horses, and humans, with devastating impact. Scientists are trying to figure out what triggers spillovers — and how to stop them. Pat Jones hide caption

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Pat Jones

An elegant way to stop deadly Hendra virus spillovers from bats to horses ... to us

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In an experiment conducted by researchers at Queen Mary University of London, bees could make their way through an unobstructed path to a feeding area or opt for a detour into a chamber with wooden balls (toys). Many took the detour. Odd Andersen/Associated Press hide caption

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Odd Andersen/Associated Press

Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen began researching whether turtle species — and other vertebrates thought to be mute — make sounds by recording his own pet turtles. The hydrophone used for recording can be seen on the left. Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen hide caption

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Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen

Dozens of species were assumed to be mute — until they were recorded making sounds

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Somers holds a baby box turtle, which could live to be 100 years old. The Box Turtle Connection plans to study turtles like these for at least the next century with the help of dedicated volunteers. Martin Kane/University of North Carolina at Greensboro hide caption

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Martin Kane/University of North Carolina at Greensboro

How do you save the beloved box turtle? A 100-year-long study

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Barred owls are known to be aggressive and territorial. A barred owl similar to this one recently attacked a Washington state woman — twice. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

An owl twice attacked a Washington woman. A biologist says it's becoming more common

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cristinairanzo/Getty Images

The Skansen Aquarium's entrance, part of the zoo on Djurgarden island, where a deadly snake escaped on Saturday via a light fixture in the ceiling of its glass enclosure, in Stockholm, Sweden, on Monday. Henrik Montgomery/TT News Agency via AP hide caption

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Henrik Montgomery/TT News Agency via AP

William Simpson with a 2-year-old Appaloosa colt near the Soda Mountain Wilderness area, straddling the Oregon and California border, in July 2022. Michelle Gough hide caption

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Michelle Gough

Preventing wildfire with the Wild Horse Fire Brigade

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Sea turtle activities are conducted under Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Marine Turtle Permits. Turtle images were acquired while conducting authorized research. Jake Lasala hide caption

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Jake Lasala