Animals Animals

The walls inside Dog Mountain's chapel are filled with thousands of notes, cards and photos, all heartfelt tributes to pets loved and lost. Carlton SooHoo/Courtesy of Dan Collison hide caption

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Carlton SooHoo/Courtesy of Dan Collison

At Vermont's Dog Mountain, Comfort And Community For Pet Lovers

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A gate blocks the entrance of a farm operated by Daybreak Foods, on May 17, 2015 near Eagle Grove, Iowa. The facility was reportedly struck by the current outbreak of bird flu. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsick says biosecurity measures are crucial to containing the spread of the disease, which has only infected birds, not humans. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Secretary Of Agriculture: Bird Flu Poses 'No Health Issue' To Humans

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Conservationists Warn Hunting, Development Threaten New Species

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The Secret Of The Syrinx: Why Birdsongs Sound Like They Do

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Dan Byers, an elite-cattle breeder, checks the heartbeat on a newborn calf, born from an embryo implanted in a surrogate heifer. Because the calf was delivered via C-section, he sprinkles sweet molasses powder on her to prompt the surrogate mother cow to lick her clean. Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Abby Wendle/Harvest Public Media

Administration Announces Controversial Plan To Protect Sage Grouse

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Fish for sale in the fish market in Fraserburgh, Scotland. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Cod Comeback: How The North Sea Fishery Bounced Back From The Brink

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Should chimps have the same legal rights as these lawyers? Steven Wise, president of the Nonhuman Rights Foundation, who is representing research chimps Hercules and Leo, says yes. Assistant Attorney General Christopher Coulston disagrees. They both made their arguments Wednesday in Manhattan State Supreme Court in New York. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

One of these things is not like the other: A 3-D printed model of a beige cowbird egg stands out from its robin's egg nest mates, though their shape and heft are similar. Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber hide caption

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Ana Lopez/Courtesy of Mark Hauber

Higher-Tech Fake Eggs Offer Better Clues To Wild-Bird Behavior

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British Cities Act To Protect Ducks With Their Own Lanes

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Surfer Alexis Gazzo (left) is helping train specialized lifeguards who will survey the waters around popular beaches in Reunion for sharks. Shark attacks have gone up sharply along the coast of the Indian Ocean island, with seven people killed in recent years. Emma Jacobs for NPR hide caption

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Emma Jacobs for NPR

An Island Wonders: Why Are The Sharks Attacking So Often?

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Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

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Plankton collected in the Pacific Ocean with a 0.1mm mesh net. Seen here is a mix of multicellular organisms — small zooplanktonic animals, larvae and single protists (diatoms, dinoflagellates, radiolarians) — the nearly invisible universe at the bottom of the marine food chain. Christian Sardet/CNRS/Tara Expeditions hide caption

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Christian Sardet/CNRS/Tara Expeditions

Revealed: The Ocean's Tiniest Life At The Bottom Of The Food Chain

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