Animals Animals

Two octopuses going at it — or, as marine biologist Peter Godfrey-Smith might put it, engaging in a bit of "ornery" behavior. Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence. hide caption

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Peter Godfrey-Smith (CUNY and University of Sydney), David Scheel (Alaska Pacific University), Stefan Linquist (University of Guelph) and Matthew Lawrence.

WATCH: Octopuses Appear To Take Up Arms As Submarine Warfare Escalates

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California condors have enormous wingspans. That's fine in the wilderness, but when a bird of this size encounters a power line, the results can be fatal. The San Diego Zoo Safari Park has a program to help train birds to avoid the hazard. Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr hide caption

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Jon Myatt/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Flickr

Small Shocks Help Enormous Birds Learn To Avoid Power Lines

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Professor Douglas Causey logs information as he tags and takes basic measurements of the birds he harvested in the Aleutian Islands on June 4. He is looking at the birds' blood and their diet, hoping to find out the ways the ocean is changing as it warms. Bob Hallinen/ADN hide caption

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Bob Hallinen/ADN

In The Stomach Of A Seabird, A Glimpse Of An Ocean Heating Up

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Cattle rancher Craig Vejraska pours out feed while checking on his cattle in a smokey field in Cox Meadow, as the Okanogan Complex fires burn outside Omak, Wash., Aug. 26, 2015. Ian C. Bates for NPR hide caption

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Ian C. Bates for NPR

In A Remote Part Of Washington, A Scramble To Save Cattle From Flames

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Male and female tungara frogs. Among these frogs, the guy with the best call usually wins the gal — except when you throw a third-choice loser into the mix. Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life hide caption

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Alexander T. Baugh/Encyclopedia of Life

Froggy Went A-Courtin', But Lady Frogs Chose Second-Best Guy Instead

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Police In Peru Treat Lost Penguin To Dinner

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Male treehoppers make their abdomens thrum like tuning forks to transmit very particular vibrating signals that travel down their legs and along leaf stems to other bugs — male and female. Courtesy of Robert Oelman hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Oelman

Good Vibrations Key To Insect Communication

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By law, all wild swans in Great Britain belong to Queen Elizabeth. Alpha/Landov hide caption

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Alpha/Landov

In Britain, Who's Tormenting The Queen's Swans?

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Australian Wombat Is Looking For Love

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Another Sound From Nature Coming Up On Thursday's Show

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Decoding Nature: Ornithology Experts Solve A Double Mystery

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'Pandamonium': It's Been A Decade Since Zoo's Panda Cam Went Live

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Giant panda Mei Xiang, together with her cub Bao Bao at the National Zoo in 2014. As of Saturday, Bao Bao now has another sibling: Her mother just gave birth to a cub. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images