Animals Animals

Fossils In New Zealand Reveal Penguins Used To Be Bigger

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An illustration comparing the giant penguin to an average person. Kumimanu biceae weighed about 220 pounds and was a bit shorter than 6 feet in height. It swam around off the coast of New Zealand between 55 and 60 million years ago. Gerald Mayr hide caption

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Gerald Mayr

Giant Prehistoric Penguins Once Swam Off The Coast Of New Zealand

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Forage fish like these at a Chilean processing plant are often used for fish meal used in aquaculture. But critics consider this inefficient and wasteful and worry it could deplete fish populations. Now several companies are developing protein substitutes to replace fish meal. Julio Etchart/ullstein bild via Getty Images hide caption

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Julio Etchart/ullstein bild via Getty Images

Sale Tambaya, a cattle herder in central Nigeria, grazes his cows. After his home state criminalized open grazing on Nov. 1, he and his family fled with their livestock to a neighboring state where grazing is allowed. Two of his sons died on the journey. Tim McDonnell for NPR hide caption

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Tim McDonnell for NPR

A tick grasping a dinosaur feather is preserved in 99 million-year-old amber from Myanmar. Peñalver et al/Nature Communications hide caption

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Peñalver et al/Nature Communications

Amber-Trapped Tick Suggests Ancient Bloodsuckers Feasted On Feathered Dinosaurs

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Black-footed ferrets are the most endangered mammal in North America. Scientists in Montana are trying to save the ferrets by saving their main food source, prairie dogs. Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images

Biologists With Drones And Peanut Butter Pellets Are On A Mission To Help Ferrets

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Researchers found that when narwhals like these were released from a net, the animals' heart rates dropped even as they were swimming rapidly. Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Flip Nicklin/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Stressed-Out Narwhals Don't Know Whether To Freeze Or Flee, Scientists Find

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A Dog Saves 2 Cats Because Dogs Are Clearly Superior Animals

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A peregrine falcon in Germany. A new study finds the birds are able to dive at high speeds and catch moving prey using a mathematical principle that also guides missiles. Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Willnow/AFP/Getty Images

Rats have been a persistent problem for cities around the world. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The Genetic Divide Between NYC's Uptown And Downtown Rats

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