Art & Design NPR explores the visual arts including design, photography, sculpture, and architecture. Interviews, commentary, and audio. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Art & Design

Small black Telfar shopping bag Arturo Holmes/Getty Images hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images

Fishermen haul in a fishing net in the eastern central Atlantic off Senegal. Belgian photographer Pierre Vanneste documents commercial fishing in his black-and-white photos. Pierre Vanneste for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Vanneste for NPR

A kiosk distributes a William Shakespeare poem at a BART station in the San Francisco Bay Area. Maria Avila/BART hide caption

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Maria Avila/BART

San Francisco's transit system is dispensing short stories to commuters

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The Jackson 5. Bruce Talamon/Taschen hide caption

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Bruce Talamon/Taschen

Bruce Talamon on photographing Black excellence in the 1970s

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Nada Thsibwabwa poses in a robot-like costume that he created using old mobile phones, in Matonge district, Kinshasa. The country is a major producer of coltan, an ore used in cellphones and other electronics. Colin Delfosse hide caption

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Colin Delfosse

Marcus Kuilan-Nazario's "Macho Stereo" is an homage to his late father, an audiophile. He says his father used to record on this reel-to-reel player. Mandalit del Barco/NPR News hide caption

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Mandalit del Barco/NPR News

Spoken word and sonic rituals: East LA exhibit features Latinx artists using sound

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A woman takes a photo of Andy Warhol's 'Shot Sage Blue Marilyn' on April 29 during Christie's 20th and 21st Century Art press preview in New York City. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

A drawing from the War Toys project and Brian McCarty's photo that interprets that image. War Toys and Brian McCarty hide caption

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War Toys and Brian McCarty

A photographer uses toys to reflect children's experiences in war

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The Katastwóf Karavan is built from a steel frame mounted to lumber running gear with red oak and muslin wall panels, a propane fired boiler, water tank, gas generator and a brass and steel 38-note steam calliope. Robert Shelley/National Gallery of Art hide caption

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Robert Shelley/National Gallery of Art

A slavery-era instrument is on the National Mall, singing 'songs of liberation'

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Hope Gangloff, Queen Jane Approximately, 2011. Acrylic on canvas, 66 x 108 inches. Collection of Alturas Foundation, San Antonio, Texas © Hope Gangloff. Adam Reich/Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC hide caption

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Adam Reich/Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC
 

How paying attention can help you appreciate what's right in front of you

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The base where the Marjorie Tallchief sculpture once stood is seen outside the Tulsa Historical Society on May 2 in Tulsa, Okla. Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP hide caption

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Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP

George Pérez, a celebrated comic book writer and artist, died at age 67 on Friday. Here, the artist is seen in 2019 at Excelsior! A Celebration of the Amazing, Fantastic, Incredible & Uncanny Life of Stan Lee, at the TCL Chinese Theatre in Los Angeles. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Life Kit: Arrange your store-bought flowers like a florist

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