Art & Design NPR explores the visual arts including design, photography, sculpture, and architecture. Interviews, commentary, and audio. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Art & Design

Many of Megan Miranda's thrillers make nature — the deep woods or a steep trail — a central and often menacing character. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How do you write a captivating thriller? This author found clues in the woods

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Artist Tunde Olaniran Steven Piper/Tunde Olaniran hide caption

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Steven Piper/Tunde Olaniran

Artist Tunde Olaniran's 'Made a Universe' opens a portal at a Detroit museum

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Yoshikazu Netsuno (left) watches his son Shinichi hammer a thick stack of specialized paper. In between each sheet is a thin layer of gold leaf. "My son is going to take over this business, so in our case, we had a successor," Netsuno says. "Many other artisans' families in Kanazawa were not so lucky." Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

Japan's traditional crafts are struggling to survive the country's population decline

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Franklin Armstrong made his debut in the Peanuts in 1968. Peanuts Worldwide LLC hide caption

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Peanuts Worldwide LLC

A project named for 'Peanuts' character Franklin aims to boost Black animators

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James McNeill Whistler's Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl, 1861–1863 National Gallery of Art hide caption

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National Gallery of Art

Whistler's Mother, meet Whistler's very, very close friend at the National Gallery

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An X-ray image shows this previously unknown self-portrait of Vincent Van Gogh painted on the reverse side of his painting Head of a Peasant Woman. Graeme Yule/National Galleries of Scotland hide caption

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Graeme Yule/National Galleries of Scotland

Takahashi's original comic inspired a worldwide craze, including an anime television series, and a popular trading card game. Christy Radecic/Invision/AP hide caption

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Christy Radecic/Invision/AP

'Yu-Gi-Oh!' creator Kazuki Takahashi found dead

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Cara Romero, "Water Memory," 2015 Cara Romero/Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York hide caption

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Cara Romero/Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

A provocative exhibit at NYC's Met Museum takes a new point of view

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A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek

Small black Telfar shopping bag Arturo Holmes/Getty Images hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images

Fishermen haul in a fishing net in the eastern central Atlantic off Senegal. Belgian photographer Pierre Vanneste documents commercial fishing in his black-and-white photos. Pierre Vanneste for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Vanneste for NPR