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Asia

Protesters hold a banner showing images, of President Trump, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and National Security Adviser John Bolton during a rally against U.S. sanctions on North Korea, near the U.S. Embassy in Seoul, South Korea. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

As India's middle class grows, more domestic tourists are coming to Gulmarg, a resort in Indian-administered Kashmir that used to be a playground for British colonial rulers in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Surrounded By Military Barracks, Skiers Shred The Himalayan Slopes Of Indian Kashmir

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Japan's Olympic Committee President Tsunekazu Takeda said Tuesday that he will step down in June, as French authorities probe his involvement in payments made before Tokyo was awarded the 2020 Summer Games. Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/AFP/Getty Images

Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev says he will leave his post after nearly 30 years in office. He's seen here at the Akkorda Palace in Astana, Kazakhstan, in 2016. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

At Toyota's LFA Works plant in Japan, the automaker manufactures 10 Mirai hydrogen fuel cell cars a day. It has plans to ramp up production. Hiroo Saso hide caption

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Hiroo Saso

Japan Is Betting Big On The Future Of Hydrogen Cars

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Darrell Blatchley, environmentalist and director of D' Bone Collector Museum, shows plastic waste found in the stomach of a Cuvier's beaked whale near the Philippine city of Davao. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Rescuers are recovering victims and searching for survivors of flash floods in Papua province, Indonesia. Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency/AP hide caption

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Indonesian National Search and Rescue Agency/AP

Seungri, photographed as he arrived at the Seoul Metropolitan Police Agency on March 14, 2019. The former pop idol was there to undergo police questioning over charges of supplying prostitution services. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, center, is escorted by police as she leaves Shah Alam High Court in Malaysia on Thursday. Malaysia's attorney general ordered the murder case to proceed against the Vietnamese woman accused in the killing of the North Korean leader's estranged half brother. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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Vincent Thian/AP

The U.S. used to ship about 7 million tons of plastic trash to China a year, where much of it was recycled into raw materials. Then came the Chinese crackdown of 2018. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Where Will Your Plastic Trash Go Now That China Doesn't Want It?

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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison fastens an Australian flag pin on Hakeem al-Araibi, a Bahraini refugee soccer player who was granted citizenship in the country on Tuesday in Melbourne. Stefan Postles/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Postles/Getty Images

An estimated 5,500 Komodo dragons live in Komodo National Park. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

Amid Tourism Push, Concern Grows Over Indonesia's Komodo Dragons

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Indian protesters in Mumbai burn posters of Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan during a demonstration against the Feb. 14 attack that killed more than 40 Indian policemen in the Kashmir region. Rajanish Kakade/AP hide caption

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Rajanish Kakade/AP

Pakistan's Long Support For Militants Puts The Country In A Bind

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Image ©2019 DigitalGlobe Inc.

Activity At 2nd North Korean Missile Site Indicates Possible Launch Preparations

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