Asia Asia

Thai Boys And Their Soccer Coach Recount Trauma Of Being Trapped In Cave

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Twelve boys and their soccer coach, rescued from a flooded cave in northern Thailand, described their ordeal at a news conference in Chiang Rai on Wednesday, after they left the hospital. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

How The Spread Of Fake Stories In India Has Led To Violence

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European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (from left), Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and European Council President Donald Tusk conclude their news conference at the Japan-EU summit on Tuesday in Tokyo. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

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Koji Sasahara/AP

Nuns of the Missionaries of Charity, the order founded by Mother Teresa, walk in annual Corpus Christi procession organized on the Feast of Christ the King in Kolkata, India, in 2016. Bikas Das/AP hide caption

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Bikas Das/AP

Sen. John McCain called President Trump's news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin "one of the most disgraceful performances by an American president in memory." Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Tourists eat fried insects, including locusts, bamboo worms, dragonfly larvae, silkworm chrysalises and more during a competition in Lijiang, China. For Westerners, eating insects means getting over the ick factor. VCG/Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/Getty Images

China's Ministry of Commerce is pursuing legal remedy against the U.S. over new tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports. Here, a container ship is unloaded at the Port of Oakland in California last week after completing a voyage from China. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

A newborn girl is the first baby born in the New Year at Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital on January 1, 2018 in Nanjing, Jiangsu Province of China. VCG/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG/VCG via Getty Images

Tesla CEO Elon Musk called a British diver involved in the rescue of the Thailand soccer team "a pedo guy" on Twitter after the diver criticized the billionaire's minisubmarine plan. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

Supporters of ousted Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif march toward Lahore's airport ahead of his arrival from London on Friday. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

Nawaz Sharif Returns To Pakistan Despite Imminent Arrest

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These Rohingya Refugees Are Working To Prepare Safer Shelters Before Monsoon Season

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Jimmy Miller is one of thousands of children born out of relationships between American servicemen and Vietnamese women during the Vietnam War. Courtesy Jimmy Miller hide caption

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Courtesy Jimmy Miller

One Man's Mission To Bring Home 'Amerasians' Born During Vietnam War

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Local government workers on Wednesday display the newly released video footage of the rescued soccer players, who are currently recuperating in hospital beds. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

Rescuers Still Searching For Survivors Of Deadly Floods In Japan

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