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Friends Nasir Dhillon (left) and Papinder Singh run a YouTube channel, Punjabi Lehar, that tries to heal the wounds of Partition through reuniting loved ones separated when British-ruled India was divided into two countries, India and Pakistan, 75 years ago. Diaa Hadid hide caption

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Diaa Hadid

Trying To Heal The Wounds Of Partition, 75 Years Later

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The COVID-19 pandemic has hit Japan's alcohol industry hard, sharpening a long-running trend away from drinking. A new campaign sponsored by the National Tax Agency hopes to change that — but it's running into sharp criticism. Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Philip Fong/AFP via Getty Images

Afghans crowd at the tarmac of the Kabul airport on August 16, 2021, to flee the country as the Taliban took control of Afghanistan. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

A U.S. Marine's View From Kabul's Airport As the City Fell to the Taliban

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Wahadat (center) stands in the ruins of the village of Mali Khel. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Afghans in a battle-scarred valley welcomed Taliban rule, but expect more

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The Kabul airport was a chaotic mess in the weeks leading up the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan as Afghans tried to flee the country. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Democrat Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts, left, and Democratic House member John Garamendi of California, second left, back, arrive with their wives at the parliament building in Taipei, on Aug. 15, 2022. Johnson Lai/AP hide caption

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Johnson Lai/AP

A man takes a picture of a poster paying homage to veteran stock market investor and Indian billionaire Rakesh Jhunjhunwala in Mumbai, India, on Sunday. Jhunjhunwala, died at the age of 62. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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Rafiq Maqbool/AP

In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, air force and naval aviation corps of the Eastern Theater Command of the Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA) fly planes at an unspecified location in China on Aug. 4. Fu Gan/Xinhua via AP, File hide caption

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Fu Gan/Xinhua via AP, File

Ishar Das Arora, 83, watches a 3-D video of his birthplace in Pakistan, through a virtual reality device. Raksha Kumar/NPR hide caption

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Raksha Kumar/NPR

75 years after India's violent Partition, survivors can cross the border — virtually

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Friends Nasir Dhillon (left) and Papinder Singh run a YouTube channel, Punjabi Lehar, that tries to heal the wounds of Partition through reuniting loved ones separated when British-ruled India was divided into two countries, India and Pakistan, 75 years ago. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

YouTube videos are helping reunite loved ones separated by the India-Pakistan border

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The bill to boost semiconductor production in the United States has been a top priority of the Biden administration. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Why Biden's plan to boost semiconductor chip manufacturing in the U.S. is so critical

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