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Vera Rahayu Putri and her husband Faizal, who goes by one name, survey earthquake damage in their Palu neighborhood of Petobo, now covered by mudslides. Putri€'s 9-year-old son, Raldi, is among thousands of children who are unaccounted for. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Parents Search For Lost Children After Indonesia's Disaster

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A woman walks in front of the China Development Bank tower in the Pudong district of Shanghai in 2015. That and the Export-Import Bank of China have provided nearly $1 trillion in financing to foreign governments since the early 2000s. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Donggala District Prison was torched by rioting prisoners one day after the double earthquake and tsunami disasters on Sept. 28. Donggala is close to the epicenter of the earthquake, and rattled prisoners wanted a way out. Noele Mage/NPR hide caption

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Noele Mage/NPR

Why Inmates Set Free After The Indonesia Quake Are Returning To Their Prison

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Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hands with President Trump during a joint statement in Beijing last November. Rather than a frontal assault on U.S. leadership, Xi has articulated his vision of a "community of shared destiny." Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saleem Abbas, a 17-year-old from northern Pakistan, sits front and center in his Chinese language class taught by Nayyar Nawaz at Pakistan's National University of Modern Languages. Saiyna Bashir for NPR hide caption

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Saiyna Bashir for NPR

In Pakistan, Learning Chinese Is Cool — And Seen As A Path To Prosperity

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Vanessa Qian/NPR

Chinese Firms Now Hold Stakes In Over A Dozen European Ports

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People cheer and throw confetti after Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta flags off a cargo train for its inaugural journey to Nairobi last year at the port of the coastal town of Mombasa. Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tony Karumba/AFP/Getty Images

A New Chinese-Funded Railway In Kenya Sparks Debt-Trap Fears

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Interpol says President Meng Hongwei resigned on Sunday. Chinese authorities say they're investigating him as part of an anti-corruption campaign. Mikhail Metzel/Mikhail Metzel/TASS hide caption

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Mikhail Metzel/Mikhail Metzel/TASS