Asia Asia

Asia

President Biden has sought to focus his administration's foreign policy on the challenges posed by China — a topic he is set to discuss with Japan's prime minister on Friday. Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, center, walks on the red carpet with Afghan officials as they review an honor guard at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on March 21. President Biden said the U.S. will withdraw all remaining troops from the country by Sept. 11, ending the U.S. involvement in the America's longest-ever war. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

A car parked in a Fresno Gurdwara, or Sikh temple, parking lot with a bumper sticker showing support for Indian farmers protesting new agricultural laws. Jonaki Mehta/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jonaki Mehta/NPR

For Calif. Sikh Farmers, India Protests Cast 'Dark Cloud' Over Vaisakhi Festival

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/987295025/987787788" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Marines conduct an operation to clear a village of Taliban fighters on July 5, 2009, in Mian Poshteh, Afghanistan. The U.S. and NATO forces plan to withdraw their remaining troops from Afghanistan by September. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga speaks to media in Tokyo this month. Suga will take part in a Friday summit meeting with President Biden, the first foreign leader to meet the president face to face. Eugene Hoshiko, Pool/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eugene Hoshiko, Pool/AP

China To Loom Large At Biden's Summit With Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/987591608/987632690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A medical worker is seen at a quarantine center for Covid-19 coronavirus infected patients at a banquet hall, which was converted into an isolation center to handle the rising cases of infection in New Delhi, India. Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anindito Mukherjee/Getty Images

Abdullah Abdullah (center), chairman of the High Council for National Reconciliation, accompanies U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken at the Sapidar Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Thursday. Sapidar Palace via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sapidar Palace via AP

President Biden unveils a $2 trillion infrastructure plan in Pittsburgh on March 31. In his speech, Biden said the plan would help the U.S. compete with China. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

For Biden, China Rivalry Adds Urgency To Infrastructure Push

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986953786/987372099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ezhil Arasi (left) and Ranjith Kumar. The pandemic kept her from her pregnancy checkups. Their baby was born with an intestinal blockage that required surgery and died during the procedure. Doctors told Ranjith that if his wife had been examined regularly during her pregnancy, there could have been a different outcome. Ranjith Kumar hide caption

toggle caption
Ranjith Kumar

People in Tokyo protest a decision to start releasing into the ocean massive amounts of treated wastewater from the Fukushima nuclear plant. The plant was damaged in a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Japan To Dump Wastewater From Wrecked Fukushima Nuclear Plant Into Pacific Ocean

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986695494/986997176" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A courier delivers goods at night on a street in Beijing in February. Costfoto/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Costfoto/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

He Tried To Organize Workers In China's Gig Economy. Now He Faces 5 Years In Jail

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984994360/986423556" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Men take a holy dip in the Ganges River on the occasion of first royal bath of Shivratri festival during Maha Kumbh Festival in Haridwar, India. Ritesh Shukla/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ritesh Shukla/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Millions Flock To Hindu Festival Amid Coronavirus Spike

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/986686352/987956461" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health worker vaccinates a Buddhist monk sitting in front of a portrait of Bhutanese King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck at a secondary school in Bhutan on March 27, the first day of the country's vaccination campaign. Less than two weeks later, health officials said 93% of eligible adults had received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. Upasana Dahal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Upasana Dahal/AFP via Getty Images

Mumbai's grand Keshavji Nayak fountain towers above the street and serves as a place of respite for thirsty passers-by. It's one of dozens of ornate fountains in the city, built during the British colonial era. Viraj Nayar for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Viraj Nayar for NPR

PHOTOS: Mumbai Falls In Love All Over Again With Its Forgotten Fountains

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985361374/986224216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Chinese and U.S. table tennis players train together in April 1971 in Beijing. April 10 marks the 50th anniversary of what became known as pingpong diplomacy between the two nations. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

50 Years Later, The Legacy Of U.S.-China 'Pingpong Diplomacy' Faces Challenges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985803697/986079375" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A mass rally is held in Pyongyang in January to celebrate North Korean leader Kim Jong Un's election as general secretary of the Workers' Party of Korea. Kim has been unusually frank in comments about the country's problems in recent months. Jon Chol Jin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Chol Jin/AP

Oh Se-hoon (center), the mayoral candidate of the main opposition People Power Party, holds flowers as he celebrates with party members after exit polls showed he would win. Song Kyung-seok/Pool photo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Song Kyung-seok/Pool photo/AFP via Getty Images