Asia Asia

Asia

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan (right), shown here in April, will arrive in Washington, D.C., for a three-day visit that begins on July 21. His meeting with President Trump comes at a pivotal time for Afghan peace negotiations. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Philippine President's War On Drugs Criticized As Crimes Against Humanity

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More Than 30 People Dead At Anime Studio In Japan After Suspected Arson

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How Americans — Some Knowingly, Some Unwittingly — Helped China's Surveillance Grow

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A youth scouts for mud crabs and snakehead fish on the parched bed of Chembarambakkam Lake on the outskirts of Chennai, India. Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP/Getty Images

The Water Crisis In Chennai, India: Who's To Blame And How Do You Fix It?

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In this 2011 photo, Hu Jintao, then China's president, visits the Confucius Institute at the Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago. China established more than 100 Confucius Institutes, which provide language and culture programs, at U.S. schools. But at least 13 universities have dropped the program due to a law that raises concerns about Chinese spying. Chris Walker/AP hide caption

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Chris Walker/AP

Trade Issue Between Japan And South Korea Revives Memories Of Past Disputes

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The State Department in Washington, D.C., in 2014. A former ­office manager there was sentenced to 40 months in prison for concealing her exchanges with Chinese intelligence agents. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Luis M. Alvarez/AP