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Asia

Emergency workers and police officers are seen at a train station in Tokyo on Sunday, after a man brandishing a knife on a commuter train stabbed several passengers before starting a fire. Kyodo News via AP hide caption

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Kyodo News via AP

Low turnout among young voters in Japan may mean the ruling party stays in power

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Inspector general report is issued on the collapse of the Afghan government

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President Biden participates in a CNN town hall at the Baltimore Center Stage Pearlstone Theater, on Oct. 21. When asked whether the U.S. would protect Taiwan if China attacked, he said the U.S. has a "commitment" to do so. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Japanese airline uses vending machines to sell mystery flights

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Tokyo's city government announced it will stop using floppy disks

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Cambodia's ties with China helped it achieve a high COVID vaccination rate

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Zalmay Khalilzad explains what went wrong with the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan

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Japan's Princess Mako marries a commoner and loses her royal status

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News brief: Zalmay Khalilzad, social media hearing, Sudan coup

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Princess Mako, who became Mako Komuro, and her husband, Kei Komuro, pose during a news conference at Grand Arc Hotel on Tuesday in Tokyo to announce their wedding. Nicolas Datiche/Pool//Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Datiche/Pool//Getty Images

Japan's Princess Mako will relocate to New York after marrying a nonroyal

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How turmoil in Afghanistan has impacted agriculture — a vital part of its livelihood

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