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Police gesture toward protesters as security forces crack down on demonstrations against the military coup in Yangon on Sunday. The United Nations says at least 18 protesters were killed Sunday, the deadliest day yet since the military took power earlier this month. Sai Aung Main/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sai Aung Main/AFP via Getty Images

Anti-coup protesters in Yangon, Myanmar. Myanmar's military government has intensified a crackdown on protesters in recent days, using tear gas, charging at and arresting protesters and journalists. Hkun Lat/Getty Images hide caption

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Hkun Lat/Getty Images

Myanmar's U.N. Ambassador Defies Military, Calls For Global Action To End Coup

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In this photo posted on the Russian Foreign Ministry Facebook page, Third Secretary Vladislav Sorokin of the Russian Embassy in North Korea pushes a handcart toward the North Korea-Russia border. Russian Foreign Ministry/Facebook hide caption

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Russian Foreign Ministry/Facebook

A South Korean human rights group has detailed how North Korea's extensive prison camps ultimately fund the nation's missile and nuclear programs. Korean Central News Agency/AP hide caption

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Korean Central News Agency/AP

Japan Faces Dilemma On Decision To Get Involved With The Coup In Myanmar

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Armenian Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan speaking at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2019. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

Rohingya Refugees From Myanmar Adrift In Indian Ocean

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William Burns, President Biden's nominee for CIA director, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday. Burns served more than 30 years at the State Department and would be the first career diplomat to lead the spy agency. Tom Williams/AP hide caption

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Tom Williams/AP

Polio vaccinator Zeenat Parveen, holding the clipboard, and a volunteer go door-to-door to reach children in Rawalpindi, a city near the Pakistani capital of Islamabad. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Pakistan's Polio Playbook Has Lessons For Its COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout

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A medical worker gives a coronavirus vaccine shot to a patient at a vaccination facility in Beijing, in January. Two pharmaceutical companies in China announced Wednesday they are seeking market approval for new vaccines. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Visitors walk past the giant word "Data" during the Guiyang International Big Data Expo 2016 in southwestern China. China says it's determined to be a leader in using artificial intelligence to sort through big data. U.S. officials say the Chinese efforts include the collection of hundreds of millions of records on U.S. citizens. The photo was released by China's Xinhua News Agency. AP hide caption

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AP

China Wants Your Data — And May Already Have It

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