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Indians who lost their lives to COVID-19 are cremated in funeral pyres in New Delhi. The aerial photo was taken on Monday. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

Funeral pyres burn in a disused granite quarry repurposed to cremate the dead due to COVID-19 on Friday in Bengaluru, India. The U.S. is set to impose new travel restrictions against travelers from the country. Abhishek Chinnappa/Getty Images hide caption

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Abhishek Chinnappa/Getty Images

An image taken by NASA's Aqua satellite as it passes over Indonesia, captures evidence of an internal wave in the same general area where the KRI Nanggala submarine disappeared earlier this month. Jeff Schmaltz/, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC hide caption

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Jeff Schmaltz/, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC

Victims of COVID-19 are cremated in funeral pyres this week in New Delhi. Scientists says the real death toll and number of infections are likely much higher than what the Indian government is reporting. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

India Is Counting Thousands Of Daily COVID Deaths. How Many Is It Missing?

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As India's COVID-19 Cases Rise, Americans Are Encouraged To Leave

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News Brief: India's COVID-19 Surge, Religious Stampede, Kamala Harris' Role

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India's Real Death Toll May Be Many Times Higher Than The Official Count

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China's 2020 Census Data Expected To Show Declining Fertility Rate

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A selfie taken by Feng Daoyou. Her older brother Feng Daokun believes she traveled to Hong Kong before flying to the U.S., from where she first contacted him in 2016. Unlike the rest of her family, she did not marry, and seemed to relish venturing far from home. "She could do anything she put her mind to. She was tough. She never gave up. That was just her personality," her brother says. Feng Daokun hide caption

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Feng Daokun

In China, Atlanta Shooting Victim's Kin Struggle To Understand Her — And Her Death

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Former President Hamid Karzai (left) and Taliban leader Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar (second right) attend an international peace conference in Moscow, Russia, in March. Russia hosted a peace conference for Afghanistan, bringing together government representatives and their Taliban adversaries along with regional observers in a bid to help jump-start the country's stalled peace process. Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool/AP

U.S. Unconditional Withdrawal Rattles Afghanistan's Shaky Peace Talks

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Tokyo Games Delivery Officer Hidemasa Nakamura holds a sample of an updated version of the playbook during a news briefing on Wednesday. Franck Robichon/Getty Images hide caption

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Franck Robichon/Getty Images

In this aerial photo, pickup trucks and vans are seen last month in a parking lot outside a General Motors assembly plant where they are produced in Wentzville, Mo. A key component in the car industry is in short supply: computer chips. Taiwan's chipmakers are racing to meet demand. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

India's Government Is Telling Facebook, Twitter To Remove Critical Posts

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