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Yukio Hatoyama, leader of the Democratic Party of Japan, exits a conference room at party headquarters in Tokyo, Aug. 31, 2009. After its landslide election win, the DPJ has begun talks on forming a new government and faces the daunting challenge of reviving the country's struggling economy. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

Myanmar Refugees Flee To China To Escape Clashes

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Japan's Opposition Elected In Historic Victory

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Japan's Ruling Party Poised To Lose Big

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Yukio Hatoyama, leader of the opposition Democratic Party of Japan, speaks at a campaign rally Tuesday at Tokyo's Akabane Station. A landslide victory is predicted for the DPJ, which would end the Liberal Democratic Party's historic run in power. Junko Kimura/Getty Images hide caption

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Junko Kimura/Getty Images
Courtesty of Jay Scruggs

CDC Tuberculosis Rule Slows International Adoption

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Former Army officer Lawrence Colburn greets My Lai Massacre survivor Do Ba in 2008. Chitose Suzuki/AP hide caption

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Chitose Suzuki/AP