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Asia

A South China Morning Post advertisement at a Hong Kong subway station. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

A Storied Hong Kong Newspaper Feels The Heat From China

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A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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Customers crowd the museum gift shop. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

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Beijing-based restaurateur Song Ji (right) demonstrates his system, which allows customers to tip waitstaff. Diners use smartphones to scan QR codes that the waitstaff wear on their sleeves. This generates a tip of 4.56 yuan, or about 70 cents. Waitress Liu Enhui (left), the top tip-getter at the restaurant, says she can earn up to $30 a day in tips. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Long Absent In China, Tipping Makes A Comeback At A Few Trendy Restaurants

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Visitors look at the China-North Korea Friendship Bridge across the Yalu River from Dandong, in northeast China. A company operating from Dandong is under fresh sanctions by the U.S. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Targets Chinese Company For Supporting N. Korean Nuclear Program

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South Korean actress Choi Eun-hee (left) and director Shin Sang-ok (right) made nearly 20 films for their captor, Kim Jong Il. Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures hide caption

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Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Acting For Film Or Acting For Life? Doc Tells Story Of Kim Jong Il's Captives

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a presidential awarding ceremony held at the Malacanang Palace in Manila, Philippines, on Monday. George Calvelo/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethnic Yi schoolgirls take a break halfway down the mountain, on their way from their homes in Atule'er village to their first day of school in a new semester. The difficulty of getting up and down the mountain has made it hard for villagers to shake off poverty, and made it challenging for their children to attend school. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

A Harrowing, Mountain-Scaling Commute For Chinese Schoolkids

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks in Manila on Aug. 29. Duterte's war on drugs has drawn widespread criticism from human rights groups. But in Davao City, where he was mayor for more than 20 years, he remains extremely popular among residents who say he brought order and improved life in what was a largely lawless city. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Criticized Abroad, Philippines' Leader Remains Hugely Popular In Home City

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