Author Interviews NPR interviews with top authors and the NPR Book Tour, a weekly feature and podcast where leading authors read and discuss their writing. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Author Interviews

Ashley C. Ford's new memoir is Somebody's Daughter. Heather Sten/Macmillan hide caption

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Heather Sten/Macmillan

In 'Somebody's Daughter' Ashley C. Ford Confronts The Crimes Of Her Father

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The Disordered Cosmos

Maddie talks with physicist Chanda Prescod-Weinstein about her new book, The Disordered Cosmos: A Journey into Dark Matter, Spacetime, and Dreams Deferred. In the episode, we talk quarks (one of the building blocks of the universe), intersectionality and access to the night sky as a fundamental right.

The Disordered Cosmos

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Mercury Rising, by Jeff Shesol WW Norton hide caption

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WW Norton

'Mercury Rising' Explores Treacherous U.S. Attempts to Control Space

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David Malan/Getty Images

4 Books To Broaden Your Pride Month Reading List

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Zakiya Dalila Harris is the author of the book The Other Black Girl. Nicole Mondestin hide caption

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Nicole Mondestin

Zakiya Dalila Harris And 'The Other Black Girl'

Zakiya Dalila Harris was working as an editorial assistant at a New York publisher when she ran into another Black woman for the first time on her office floor. That's when she got the idea for her book, The Other Black Girl. What's it like when you're used to being the only one, but now there's another one like you? And what if things get weird? Like, really weird. Sam and Zakiya talk about how her book subverts the office drama and what lessons it has for a still very white publishing industry.

Zakiya Dalila Harris And 'The Other Black Girl'

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John Marshall Harlan, who was named for Chief Justice John Marshall, served on the Supreme Court from 1877 until his death in 1911. Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Corbis via Getty Images

The Supreme Court Justice Who Made History By Voting No on Racial Segregation

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Civil rights activists are blocked by National Guard members brandishing bayonets while trying to stage a protest on Beale Street in Memphis, Tenn., in 1968. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Historian Uncovers The Racist Roots Of The 2nd Amendment

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Clint Smith is a staff writer at The Atlantic and the author of the poetry collection Counting Descent. Carletta Girma/Courtesy of Broadside hide caption

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Carletta Girma/Courtesy of Broadside

Slavery Wasn't 'Long Ago': A Writer Exposes The Disconnect In How We Tell History

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NIghtboat Books

Mapping A Path Forward For The Asian Diaspora In 'Imagine Us, The Swarm'

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Sinead O'Connor performs at August Hall in San Francisco, Calif., in February 2020. Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

Sinéad O'Connor Has A New Memoir ... And No Regrets

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St. Martin's Griffin

What's In A Genre Name? The Trouble With 'Asian Fantasy'

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Atria Books

'The Other Black Girl' In This New Thriller May Not Be Your Friend

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A tobacco store advertises and sells Juul tobacco products in midtown Manhattan. Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images

Big Vape: The Incendiary Rise of Juul E-cigarettes

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Yusef Salaam, shown above in 2019, reflects on his wrongful conviction in the memoir, Better, Not Bitter. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Central Park 'Exonerated 5' Member Reflects On Freedom And Forgiveness

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Simon & Schuster

'70s Music Journalism Gets An Overdue Rewrite In Debut Novel 'Opal & Nev'

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for GLAAD

Not My Job: Jenny Finney Boylan Gets Quizzed On Hot Dogs

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G.P. Putnam's Sons

In David Yoon's New Novel, Resetting The Internet To 'Version Zero'

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Seth Rogen and his producing partner Evan Goldberg recently founded a company that sells marijuana. Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Samir Hussein/WireImage/Getty Images

Seth Rogen On The Comedy Advice He Got At 12 That He Still Thinks About

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Brian Broome's debut memoir is Punch Me Up To The Gods. Andy Johanson Photography hide caption

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Andy Johanson Photography

'Love Letter To Black Boys': Memoir Explores Masculinity Against Appalachian Backdrop

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