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Author Interviews

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Facing The Fiscal Cliff: Congress' Next Showdown

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A Portrait Of A Country Awash In 'Red Ink'

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Writer Karin Slaughter has seen the fallout of some of Atlanta's most gruesome crimes and most dramatic transitions. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Allied troops invade Juno Beach on D-Day. Ben MacIntyre's latest book, Double Cross, recounts the grand deception beforehand that helped make the invasion a success. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Before The D-Day Invasion, Double Talk And Deceit

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In '1493,' Uncovering The World Columbus Discovered

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'Sorry Please Thank You': Technically, We're All Alone

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Christopher Beha is an associate editor at Harper's magazine and the author of The Whole Five Feet. Josephine Sittenfeld/Tin House Books hide caption

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Josephine Sittenfeld/Tin House Books

Christopher Beha, On Faith And Its Discontents

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The Poughkeepsie Honey Bugs (1913-1914) may not sound intimidating, but their name does reflect the town's spirit. According to author and sportscaster Tim Hagerty, when Poughkeepsie, N.Y., officially became a city in 1854, its seal featured a beehive as a nod to the town's industrial and entrepreneurial beginnings. Cider Mill Press/National Baseball Hall of Fame Library hide caption

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Cider Mill Press/National Baseball Hall of Fame Library

Gasbags To Honey Bugs: Baseball's Nutty Team Names

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Elton John speaks at the International Aids Conference in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

David Crist's father, George (left), discusses operations against Iranian attack boats with Navy Lt. Paul Hillenbrand. George Crist, a Marine Corps general, was commander of CENTCOM from 1985-1988. Courtesy of David Crist hide caption

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Courtesy of David Crist

In his new book, Iain Sinclair bemoans what the construction of Olympic Park and the Olympic Stadium has done to his East London neighborhood. Streeter Lecka/Getty Images hide caption

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For U.K. Author, Games A 'Smoke And Circuses' Affair

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Unraveling The Genetic Code That Makes Us Human

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Crime novelist Jo Nesbo says despite Oslo's well-kept streets and sharply dressed residents, the city has a dark and seedy side. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

Jo Nesbo's Fiction Explores Oslo's Jagged Edges

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