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Illustrations © 2024 by Erin Kraan

'Buffalo Fluffalo' has had enuffalo in this kids' bookalo

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Vashti Harrison's Big and Dave Eggers' The Eyes and the Impossible took top honors from the American Library Assocation. Alfred A. Knopf/McSweeney's and Little, Brown and Co. hide caption

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Alfred A. Knopf/McSweeney's and Little, Brown and Co.

Dave Eggers wins Newbery, Vashti Harrison wins Caldecott in 2024 kids' lit prizes

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Illustrations © 2023 by Anait Semirdzhyan

Mop-mop-swoosh-plop it's rug-washing day in 'Bábo'

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Public libraries reveal their most borrowed books of 2023

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Amazon-owned Goodreads makes little effort to verify users, and critics say this enables a practice known as review-bombing, in which a book is flooded with negative reviews, often from fake accounts, in an effort to bring down a its rating, sometimes for reasons having nothing to do with the book's contents. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Goodreads has a 'review bombing' problem — and wants its users to help solve it

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Cord Jefferson, right, writer/director/producer of "American Fiction," is seen with cast member Jeffrey Wright, left, and Percival Everett, author of the book Erasure upon which the movie is based, at a screening of the film on Dec. 5 at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, Calif. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
Illustrations Copyright © 2023 by Jon Klassen

Inquiring minds want to know: 'How Does Santa Go Down the Chimney?'

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Illustrations © Axel Scheffler

Beware! 'The Baddies' are here to scare your kids — and make them laugh

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A wildfire burns south of Fort McMurray, Alberta, near Highway 63 on Saturday, May 7, 2016. A book about an inferno that ravaged a Canadian city and has been called a portent of climate chaos has won Britain's leading nonfiction book prize. Jonathan Hayward/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Hayward/AP

Justin Torres' novel Blackouts won the National Book Award for fiction on Wednesday night. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Justin Torres wins at National Book Awards as authors call for cease-fire in Gaza

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Scholastic says it will stop offering the controversial collection of race- and gender-related titles at middle school book fairs starting in January. Getty Images hide caption

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Almost half of all babies born in the U.S. in 2019 were born to unmarried mothers, a dramatic increase since 1960, when only 5% of births were to unmarried mothers. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Siblings Hazel and Fiver from Watership Down: The Graphic Novel by Richard Adams, adapted by James Sturm and illustrated by Joe Sutphin. The 2023 graphic novel is the latest adaptation of the 1972 children's classic. Ten Speed Graphic hide caption

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Ten Speed Graphic

A new graphic novel version of 'Watership Down' aims to temper darkness with hope

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Cartoonist Amy Kurzweil's new graphic memoir, Artificial: A Love Story, focuses on how she and her father Ray harnessed the power of artificial intelligence to connect with the grandfather she never knew. Marissa Leshnov for NPR hide caption

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Marissa Leshnov for NPR

Using AI, cartoonist Amy Kurzweil connects with deceased grandfather in 'Artificial'

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John Grisham at his office in Charlottesville, Va. His new book is a sequel to The Firm, the book that turned him into a star. Donald Johnson/The New York Times/Doubleday hide caption

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Donald Johnson/The New York Times/Doubleday

What is certain in life? Death, taxes — and a new book by John Grisham

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