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The contest judges Juanita Giles, Corey Hayes, Kelly Davidson, Christine Simmons/Scholastic hide caption

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Juanita Giles, Corey Hayes, Kelly Davidson, Christine Simmons/Scholastic

Then-national security adviser John Bolton at the White House in July 2019. Bolton received a reported $2 million advance for his book about his time in the Trump administration, but a judge has raised the possibility that he may not be able to keep it. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

John Bolton's Big Paycheck For His Book May Be In Jeopardy

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A copy of John Bolton's new book, The Room Where It Happened, stands in the White House briefing room. On Saturday, a federal judge declined the Trump administration's request to block the publication of the former national security adviser's book. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP
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'Interrupt The Systems': Robin DiAngelo On 'White Fragility' And Anti-Racism

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Former U.S. national security adviser John Bolton speaks in September at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Washington D.C.'s Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library is one of the libraries trying to accomodate patrons' different needs during the pandemic. Thomas Hawk/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Thomas Hawk/Flickr Creative Commons

J.K. Rowling signs copies of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows in 2007. Many fans say they feel alienated and hurt by her recent comments. Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriel Bouys/AFP via Getty Images

Author L.L. McKinney started the #PublishingPaidMe hashtag so authors could publicize racial disparities in book advances. Nicole McLaughlin hide caption

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Nicole McLaughlin

#PublishingPaidMe: Authors Share Their Advances To Expose Racial Disparities

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Writer and activist Larry Kramer, here in 1989, was an unapologetically loud and irrepressible voice in the fight against AIDS. Sara Krulwich/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara Krulwich/Getty Images

Larry Kramer, Pioneering AIDS Activist And Writer, Dies At 84

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Clare Schneider/NPR

An Illustrated Guide To Showing Up For Yourself

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Stephenie Meyer, shown here in 2015, says she plans to release another "Twilight" book. Paul A. Hebert/Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP hide caption

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Paul A. Hebert/Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP