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In Zora Neale Hurston's 'Barracoon,' Language Is The Key To Understanding

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Arizona Sen. John McCain attends the 2012 Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Sen. John McCain Reads From His Forthcoming Memoir, 'The Restless Wave'

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Music is integral to Arena Stage's Snow Child, and actors sometimes join the house band on their own instruments. Maria Baranova-Suzuki hide caption

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Maria Baranova-Suzuki

'Snow Child' Conveys Alaska's Wild Magic In Musical Form

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Protesters gathered earlier this month outside Stockholm's Old Stock Exchange building, where the Swedish Academy meets. Demonstrators showed support for resigned Permanent Secretary Sara Danius by wearing her hallmark tied blouse. Fredrik Persson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fredrik Persson/AFP/Getty Images

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is an original play by John Tiffany, Jack Thorne and J.K. Rowling. Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Boneau/Bryan-Brown hide caption

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Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Boneau/Bryan-Brown

Muggles Rejoice: 'Harry Potter And The Cursed Child' Is Now On Broadway

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Buckle Up: The cover of Action Comics #1000, by Jim Lee (pencils), Scott Williams (inks) and Alex Sinclair (coloring). Courtesy of DC Entertainment hide caption

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Courtesy of DC Entertainment

The Stockholm Stock Exchange Building, which has housed the Royal Swedish Academy since the early 20th century, seen in 2010. "It is a bomb dropped right onto the Stock Exchange Building," a local culture editor said of the allegations and subsequent resignations. "The institution is in ruins." Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Judy Norsigian, executive director and founder of Our Bodies, Ourselves, speaks behind a copy of the women's health guide at the National Press Club in 2012. Robert MacPherson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert MacPherson/AFP/Getty Images

Feminist Health Guide 'Our Bodies, Ourselves' Will Stop Publishing

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'The Italian Teacher' Paints A Troubled Father-Son Relationship

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You might not recognize the names of the 2018 Whiting Award winners, but you probably recognize many of their predecessors — including Pulitzer winner Jorie Graham, National Book Award winner Jonathan Franzen, David Foster Wallace, NBA winners Denis Johnson and Adam Johnson, and Man Booker winner Lydia Davis. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Australian author Peter Carey says he "couldn't not write" about his country's dark history of racism. Michael Lionstar hide caption

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Michael Lionstar

Novelist Peter Carey Confronts Dark History In 'A Long Way From Home'

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Sherman Alexie speaks at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples' Day at Seattle's City Hall in 2016. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

'It Just Felt Very Wrong': Sherman Alexie's Accusers Go On The Record

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