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"Master Slave Husband Wife" reconstructs the dramatic escape of a couple from slavery in 1848. Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Simon & Schuster

Ilyon Woo's new book explores the relentless pursuit of freedom

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Illustrations © Lane Smith

After 30+ years, 'The Stinky Cheese Man' is aging well

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Then-British Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves 10 Downing Street, in London, in May 2022. Johnson has signed a deal to write a memoir of his tumultuous time in office. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

Author George M. Johnson wrote All Boys Aren't Blue, which is on the American Library Association's list of most banned books. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Russell Banks' 1985 breakout novel, Continental Drift, was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. He's pictured above in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in December 2007. Thony Belizaire/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Thony Belizaire/AFP via Getty Images

Novelist Russell Banks, dead at age 82, found the mythical in marginal lives

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A person at home in Edinburgh, United Kingdom, watches Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, being interviewed by ITV's Tom Bradby during "Harry: The Interview," two days before his controversial autobiography "Spare" is published, Sunday, Jan. 8, 2023. Jane Barlow/AP hide caption

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Jane Barlow/AP
Kaz Fantone/NPR

Author Maia Kobabe wrote Gender Queer, which is on the American Library Association's lists of most banned books. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Author Jerry Craft wrote New Kid, which has faced challenges in some school districts. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Nikki Grimes, the winner of the ALA Coretta Scott King - Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, has written more than 100 children's books. Aaron Lemen/Astra Young Readers hide caption

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Aaron Lemen/Astra Young Readers

2022 was a good year for Nikki Grimes, who just published her 103rd book

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Author Susan Kuklin wrote Beyond Magenta, which is on the American Library Association's lists of most banned books. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Sources say the House panel investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol is set to release its report on Dec. 21 — and publishers are ready to pounce. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Author Ashley Hope Pérez wrote Out of Darkness, which is on the American Library Association's lists of most banned books. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Conrad

2022 Books We Love: Staff Picks

Books We Love is a yearly labor of love here at NPR. Every year, the Books We Love team solicits recommendations from NPR staff and book critics and culls through them, creating an interactive reading guide you can use to find the perfect book for you or someone you love. Today, we're talking staff picks.

2022 Books We Love: Staff Picks

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Jessica Love / Cameron + Company

Kids want to know: 'Will It Be Okay?' — this book answers that question

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