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Renia Spiegel (left) and her younger sister, now known as Elizabeth Bellak, wade in the Dniester River around 1935. The photo can be seen on the cover of the published edition of Renia's Diary. Courtesy of Elizabeth Bellak/St. Martin's Press hide caption

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Courtesy of Elizabeth Bellak/St. Martin's Press

Renia Spiegel's Diary Survived The Holocaust. People Are Finally Reading It

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Tracy Chevalier Says 'A Single Thread' Can Make All The Difference

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Bob Iger, CEO and chairman of The Walt Disney Co., and Mickey Mouse rang the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange in November 2017. Iger's new book is an account of what he has learned running Disney. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Disney CEO Bob Iger Has Lessons On Fostering Creativity — And Acquiring It

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Audrey Hepburn appears as Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady. In a letter to director George Cukor, she raved about the script. AP hide caption

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AP

In Golden Age Hollywood, Film Stars Slid Into Each Others' Telegrams

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Bruce Springsteen performing in 2012 during a campaign rally for former President Barack Obama in Des Moines, Iowa. Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Brooks Kraft/Corbis via Getty Images

Hear Margaret Atwood's Exclusive Reading Of 'The Testaments'

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Clockwise from top left: Quichotte by Salman Rushdie; Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann; An Orchestra of Minorities by Chigozie Obioma; 10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World by Elif Shafak; Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo; and The Testaments by Margaret Atwood. Courtesy of the publishers hide caption

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Courtesy of the publishers

Jenna Bush Hager promotes her August book club pick, Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn. Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

For Many Authors, Celebrity Book Clubs Are A Ticket To Success

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Individuals from all walks of life join together at Silent Book Clubs around the world to socialize, meet new people and trade book recommendations. When the bell rings, it's reading time, and people can read whatever they like, as long as it's in silence. Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jonathan McHugh/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Téa Obreht's Latest Is Steeped In The Supernatural — Also, There Are Camels

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Toni Morrison was the author of Beloved, Song of Solomon and The Bluest Eye. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Michel Euler/AP hide caption

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Michel Euler/AP

Toni Morrison, Whose Soaring Novels Were Rooted In Black Lives, Dies At 88

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