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Planet money revives Micro-Face for the present day Siena Mae/NPR hide caption

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Siena Mae/NPR

We Buy a Superhero: Resurrection

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Unemployment Insurance And Vaccines: Who's Left Behind?

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Jennifer Granholm is sworn in as energy secretary Thursday. Granholm told NPR that pivoting to a clean energy economy could ensure a dependable grid and help create jobs. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Energy Secretary Granholm: Texas Outages Show Need For Changes To U.S. Power Systems

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A British Airways plane comes in to land behind a tail fin at Heathrow Airport in London. On Friday, the head of the group that owns BA called for instituting an electronic health pass for passengers as the company announced steep losses due to COVID-19. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Hofstra University student Divya Singh found herself beset by a double whammy of bills from two of the costliest kinds of institutions in America — colleges and hospitals. After experiencing anxiety when her family had trouble coming up with the money for her tuition, she sought counseling and ended up with a weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital — and a resulting $3,413 bill. Jackie Molloy for KHN hide caption

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Jackie Molloy for KHN

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

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Facebook is pushing back on new Apple privacy rules for its mobile devices, this time saying the social media giant is standing up for small businesses in television and radio advertisements and full page newspaper ads. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?

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TikTok on Wednesday agreed to pay $92 million to settle claims stemming from a class-action lawsuit alleging the app illegally tracked and shared the personal data of users without their consent. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP
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2021: The Year Of The Recovery?

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Vaccine makers are moving to test booster shots, prompted by new coronavirus variants that have sprung up in South Africa, the U.K. and elsewhere. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

The Federal Aviation Administration must fix oversight weaknesses found following the Boeing 737 Max crashes, according to a new report from the Transportation Department's inspector general. Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images

US President Joe Biden speaks about the American Rescue Plan and the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) for small businesses in response to coronavirus, in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, February 22, 2021. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Bond Voyage

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The $1,000 Power Bill

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A health care worker looks away as she's immunized with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at Klerksdorp Hospital in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 18. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy speaks during a House Oversight Committee hearing about the U.S. Postal Service on Wednesday. Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Pressure, Postmaster General Calls For Changes To Mail Delivery

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Aniya's overnight shift at an Amazon warehouse became impractical when daycare and school were canceled for her two children because of the pandemic. She was able to avoid eviction with the help of a lawyer and emergency rental assistance but she recently received a letter saying that her lease would not be renewed and she had to vacate the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium

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Concierge health care provider One Medical allowed patients who were not eligible — and those with connections to the company's leadership — to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line ahead of high-risk patients. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

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