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Even before Amazon booted Parler off its Web service, Apple and Google had banned it from their respective app stores. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Judge Refuses To Reinstate Parler After Amazon Shut It Down

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President Biden swears in presidential appointees during a virtual ceremony in the State Dining Room of the White House on Wednesday. Data on Thursday showed new claims for state unemployment benefits reached 900,000, showcasing the weakening U.S. jobs picture. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A Trader Joe's worker disinfects shopping carts and controls the number of customers allowed to shop at one time in Omaha, Neb., on May 7, 2020. Grocers like Trader Joe's are offering pay incentives to encourage their workers to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Vehicles drive on highway I-94 in St. Paul, Minn., on Nov. 7, 2020. A recent report from the International Energy Agency said emissions fell across most parts of the economy, with one notable exception: SUVs. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Biden's Econ Plan: 3 Indicators To Watch

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Trump appointee Michael Pack resigned as the head of the federal agency over the Voice of America and other broadcasters at President Biden's request. U.S. Agency for Global Media hide caption

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U.S. Agency for Global Media

Tenants' rights advocates protesting evictions during the pandemic in Boston this month. They want the Biden administration to not only extend, but also strengthen, an eviction order from the CDC aimed at keeping people in their homes during the outbreak. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

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Michael Dwyer/AP

The Keystone XL pipeline was set to have passed near the White River in South Dakota. President Biden plans to block the controversial pipeline in one of his first acts of office. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Embracing Modern Monetary Theory is like staring at this optical illusion. You can look at the same thing, and see things totally differently. Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons

Modern Monetary Theory (Classic)

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JOHN THYS/AFP via Getty Images

The Social Media Crisis

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President-elect Joe Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, Janet Yellen, here in 2019, is urging greater federal spending to cope with the pandemic and to help boost the struggling economy. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Yellen Urges Congress To 'Act Big' To Prop Up Pandemic-Scarred Economy

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Baltimore is struggling to pay for the massive infrastructure and public health costs associated with global warming. As in many cities, flood risk has dramatically increased as the Earth has gotten hotter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Supreme Court Considers Baltimore Suit Against Oil Companies Over Climate Change

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People walk in Wuhan on Jan. 10, the eve of the first anniversary of China confirming its first COVID-19 death. Chinese officials said on Monday that its economy managed to grow 2.3% in 2020. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Gary Gensler, pictured during a Senate hearing in July 2013, will be nominated to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission for the Biden administration. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

There's plenty of social distance out on the slopes, but resorts are requiring masks in lift lines and lodges and limiting lodge use. Most skiers and boarders are happy to comply but Schweitzer Mountain in Idaho had to suspend season passes for some who refused to wear masks and were verbally abusive to lift line attendants. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hide caption

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Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Ski Down and Mask Up — Resorts Try To Stay Safe In Pandemic Skiing Boom

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