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President Trump, who uses Twitter as his primary form of communication, has long accused Facebook and Twitter of censoring conservative views. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Trump Threatens To Shut Down Social Media After Twitter Adds Warning To His Tweets

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Avery Hoppa with her 3-year-old daughter Zelda. Hoppa says she's "incredibly grateful" that she and her husband still have jobs. But she says it "feels weird to be a consumer right now" as many are struggling financially. Avery Hoppa hide caption

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Avery Hoppa

President Trump and China's President Xi Jinping, shown in 2019, have faced criticism for their handling of the coronavirus. Both are now pushing hard for a vaccine. The United States has already agreed to pay a drug company more than $1 billion to produce a vaccine that's yet to be approved. Xi says if China succeeds in developing a vaccine, it will be declared "a global public good." Kevin Lamarque/Reuters hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

In The Battle Against COVID-19, A Risk Of 'Vaccine Nationalism'

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The city of Wuhan, where the coronavirus first began to spread, is pictured on May 14. Many Chinese cities have seen rush hour traffic return to pre-pandemic levels — or worse — after reopening, according to traffic data company TomTom. Cities around the world are trying to figure out how to avoid disastrous gridlock as residents resume travel while avoiding public transit. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

As Lockdown Orders Lift, Can Cities Prevent A Traffic Catastrophe?

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The April 19 edition of The Boston Globe had 16 pages of obituaries. Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

Obituary Writer Aims To Show How Coronavirus Impacts 'All People In Our Society'

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Keri Belcher, who has worked in the oil and gas industry, says she's considering switching careers — even if it means less time outdoors, which is what attracted her to geology in the first place. Peter Flaig hide caption

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Peter Flaig

Cathy Cody is owner/operator of No Ifs Ands Or Butts About It Janitorial Services & More, LLC in Albany, Ga. Jason Cabatit/JCabatit Photography hide caption

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Jason Cabatit/JCabatit Photography

In Homes Left Empty By COVID-19, This Georgia Woman Packs Up The Memories

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Workers prepare takeout orders May 1 in Houston. For more than two out of three unemployed workers, jobless benefits exceed their old pay, researchers say. That discrepancy can raise awkward questions for workers, bosses and policymakers. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

For Many, $600 Jobless Benefit Makes It Hard To Return To Work

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Traders wear masks as they work in their posts at the New York Stock Exchange on Tuesday, the first day of in-person trading since the exchange closed in March because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

California Gov. Gavin Newsom says places of worship can resume in-person services pending county approval. Attendance will be limited to fewer than 100 or 25% of the building's capacity, whichever is lower. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

On Sunday, visitors strolled the pier at Coney Island beach. New York state parks reopened for the Memorial Day weekend at 50% capacity, and campgrounds were given the green light to reopen Monday. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Downtown Houston, Texas in 2019. Loren Elliott/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/AFP via Getty Images

With Moratorium Lifted, Houston Becomes Largest U.S. City Where Evictions Can Resume

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