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Darian Woods/Darian Woods

Boeing's woes, Bilt jilts, and the Indicator's stock rally

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The incoming editor of The Washington Post, Robert Winnett, has withdrawn from the job and will remain in the U.K. Andrew Harnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Getty Images

Drama compounds at The Post's highest ranks as new editor declines job

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In light of several recent incidents involving alleged racial discrimination toward its passengers, American Airlines CEO Robert Isom says he is taking immediate action to “rebuild trust” within the company. Here, Isom speaks at a news conference in Seattle on Feb. 13, 2020 about the company's new partnership with Alaska Airlines. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

While Jovaan Lumpkin was in prison, his mother spent thousands of dollars in phone calls to stay connected. His mom, Diane Lewis, continues to advocate to make these calls free for prisoners and their families. Adrian Ma/NPR hide caption

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Adrian Ma/NPR

Lakethia Clark stands in her son's bedroom in her home in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Clark will soon open her own home-based child care business. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

MEETING CHILD CARE NEEDS IN TUSCALOOSA

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Olympic athlete in fencing, Daryl Homer, models the Team USA Paris Olympics opening ceremony uniform at Ralph Lauren headquarters on Monday in New York. Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP/Invision hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP/Invision
Darian Woods/NPR

Amazon Labor Union President Chris Smalls leads a pro-union march in New York City in 2022. Workers at an Amazon warehouse on Staten Island voted to unionize that year, but they've since struggled to negotiate a contract with the company. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

In this photo provided by the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, U.S. Coast Guard marine safety engineers survey the aft titanium endcap from the Titan submersible, in the North Atlantic Ocean in October 2023. AP/U.S. National Transportation Safety Board hide caption

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AP/U.S. National Transportation Safety Board

A year after the Titan submersible implosion, investigators still don't have answers

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Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WDC) in June. Many of the features Apple announced there will duplicate the services of 3rd-party apps, a practice known as "Sherlocking." Nic Coury/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nic Coury/AFP via Getty Images

APPLE ACCUSED OF 'SHERLOCKING'

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Photo by Steve Eason/Hulton Archive/Getty Images Steve Eason/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Eason/Getty Images

Spud spat

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Vehicles drive toward downtown Minneapolis on Interstate 35 on a Sunday in May. Jenn Ackerman for NPR hide caption

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Jenn Ackerman for NPR

Uber and Lyft's playbook to stop minimum wage bills in Minnesota

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For decades, London's Fleet Street was the home of Britain's biggest newspapers, the tradition from which Washington Post CEO Will Lewis and incoming top editor Robert Winnett come. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

New ‘Washington Post’ chiefs can’t shake their past

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