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Business Story of the Day

Examining the railway labor deal. Is it a win for both sides?

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on September 23, 2022 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A bad year for Wall Street gets even worse, as stock markets finish September down

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Bed Bath & Beyond is working on yet another turnaround after a series of crises and missteps. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Will Bed Bath & Beyond sink like Sears or rise like Best Buy?

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Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing will pay $200 million to settle SEC charges over 737 Max crashes

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Both home prices and the pace of home sales are falling nationally as higher mortgage rates cool off the market. tommy/Getty Images hide caption

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tommy/Getty Images

Home prices see biggest drop in 9 years, thanks to higher mortgage rates

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Vehicles drive past a sign on the 110 Freeway warning of extreme heat and urging energy conservation during a heat wave in downtown Los Angeles on Sept. 2. Soaring electricity bills are pinching many household budgets across the country even as gasoline prices have come down. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Soaring electricity bills are the latest inflation flashpoint

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The Internal Revenue Service building is seen in Washington, D.C., on April 5. The IRS got $80 billion in new funding as part of the climate and health care bill passed by Congress on Friday. Most of that money will be used to target wealthier tax evaders. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The IRS just got $80 billion to beef up. A big goal? Going after rich tax dodgers

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People shop for school supplies at a Target store in Miami, Fla., on July 27. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

Binders, backpacks... and inflation are on this year's back-to-school shopping list

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Netflix reports that it lost nearly 1 million subscribers in the second quarter of 2022, but that was better than the 2 million it had forecast. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Netflix loses nearly 1 million subscribers. That's the good news

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U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen attends a meeting in Seoul, South Korea on Tuesday. She spoke to Morning Edition about some of the initiatives she's been promoting on her trip overseas. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Yellen believes U.S. will get on board with global minimum corporate tax — eventually

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Contractors work on the roof of a house under construction in Louisville, Ky. A new study shows the U.S. is 3.8 million homes short of meeting housing needs. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

There's a massive housing shortage across the U.S. Here's how bad it is where you live

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Google announced that it would delete location data showing when people visit abortion providers, but privacy experts, and some Google employees, want the company to do more to safeguard data. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Privacy advocates fear Google will be used to prosecute abortion seekers

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Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

As economy cools, scattered layoffs put an end to dream jobs for some workers

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Ezra Bailey/Getty Images

Job cuts are rolling in. Here's who is feeling the most pain so far

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Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with the head of Russia's Federal Financial Monitoring Service, Yury Chikhanchin, at the Kremlin in Moscow on Monday. Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

What's happening with Russia's 1st default on foreign debt in a century

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A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. A new report says the technology's security is vulnerable. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Cryptocurrency tech is vulnerable to tampering, a DARPA analysis finds

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Facebook parent company Meta releases new parental controls for Instagram

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The baby-formula shortage has led some to question why the U.S. doesn't provide more support for breastfeeding. Here, a woman breastfeeds her son outside New York City Hall during a 2014 rally to support breastfeeding in public. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The baby formula shortage is prompting calls to increase support for breastfeeding

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Federal regulators on Wednesday announced a settlement with Twitter over the use of user privacy. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Twitter will pay a $150 million fine over accusations it improperly sold user data

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Workers walk to cast their votes over whether or not to unionize, at an Amazon warehouse on Staten Island on March 25, 2022. Another Amazon warehouse across the street began voting on a union on Monday. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

A 2nd Amazon warehouse on Staten Island begins voting on a union

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Student loan borrowers will get help after an NPR report and years of complaints

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Chris Smalls, president of the Amazon Labor Union, pauses while walking with supporters as they march at the Amazon distribution center in the Staten Island borough of New York on Oct. 25, 2021. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Chris Smalls started Amazon's 1st union. He's now heard from workers at 50 warehouses

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