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"We have only begun to scratch the surface of the complex problems inherent in figuring out ... the brain's inner workings," said Paul Allen in 2012. Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images

The cost of a pint of beer could rise sharply in the U.S. and other countries because of increased risks from heat and drought, according to a new study that looks at climate change's possible effects on barley crops. Peter Nicholls/Reuters hide caption

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Peter Nicholls/Reuters

Nancy Barnes, executive editor at the Houston Chronicle, was named as NPR's senior vice president for news and editorial director. Courtesy of the Houston Chronicle hide caption

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Courtesy of the Houston Chronicle

Veteran Newspaper Editor Nancy Barnes Named NPR's Top News Executive

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Drug addiction is a big concern to rural Americans, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Alice Goldfarb/NPR hide caption

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Alice Goldfarb/NPR

NPR Poll: Rural Americans Are Worried About Addiction And Jobs, But Remain Optimistic

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Wyoming attorney Karen Budd-Falen, recently named as Deputy Solicitor for Parks and Wildlife at the Department of the Interior, sits in her law office in Cheyenne, Wyo. Mead Gruver/AP hide caption

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Mead Gruver/AP

According to the law in most states, health care providers own patients' medical records. But federal privacy law governs how that information can be used. And whether or not you can profit from your own medical data is murky. alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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alicemoi/Getty Images/RooM RF

If Your Medical Information Becomes A Moneymaker, Could You Get A Cut?

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At a recent meeting of the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, angry taxi drivers who want the city to buy back their medallions, surrounded Kate Toran, who heads the city's taxi program. Sam Harnett/KQED hide caption

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Sam Harnett/KQED

Cities Made Millions Selling Taxi Medallions, Now Drivers Are Paying the Price

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Sam Richman, owner-chef of Sammy's Deluxe restaurant in Rockland, says his patrons tend to prefer full-grown unagi smoked, European style, rather than as Japanese sushi. Keith Shortall/Maine Public Radio hide caption

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Keith Shortall/Maine Public Radio