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A slew of companies will cover travel expenses for employees that have to travel out of their state for an abortion after the Supreme Court overturned federal protections for the procedure. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Last year, President Biden announced "Build Back Better World," meant to compete with China's Belt and Road Initiative. This year at the G-7, Biden will unveil the first projects. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Brandon Schwedes of Port Orange, Fla., with his 11-year-old daughter and 8-year-old son. Schwedes had to move this year when the landlord dramatically raised the rent, then was outbid before finding another place he could afford. Brandon Schwedes hide caption

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Brandon Schwedes

A Bitcoin ATM. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Does Bitcoin have a grip on the economy?

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A "For Lease" sign is posted in front of a house available for rent on March 15, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The House Select Committee has used TV news techniques and documentary evidence to argue that then President Donald Trump knowingly pressured public officials to commit illegal acts. In this case, the panel displayed a transcript of his call to Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger as it played excerpts of the audio. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Scientists hope the larvae of the darkling beetle — nicknamed "superworms" — might solve the world's trash crisis thanks to their uncanny ability to eat polystyrene. The University of Queensland hide caption

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The University of Queensland

How 'superworms' could help solve the trash crisis

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Jerome Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Lots of onions. Jess Jiang/NPR hide caption

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Jess Jiang/NPR

The tale of the Onion King (Update)

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Seven Starbucks workers in Buffalo, N.Y. say they were fired because of their involvement in unionizing. The National Labor Relations Board is asking a court to reinstate them. Joshua Bessex/AP hide caption

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Joshua Bessex/AP

Emergency personnel arrive to evacuate people at a mass shelter, on Sept. 2, 2021 in Independence, La. The owner of seven Louisiana nursing homes whose residents suffered in squalid conditions after being evacuated to a warehouse for Hurricane Ida has been arrested. Chris Granger/The New Orleans Advocate via AP hide caption

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Chris Granger/The New Orleans Advocate via AP

Workers at an Amazon warehouse on Staten Island voted in March 2022 to join the Amazon Labor Union. Amazon is presenting its objections to the election before a National Labor Relations Board hearing being conducted over Zoom. Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Marilynn Malerba stands next to a photograph of late Chief Ralph Sturges at tribal offices in Uncasville, Conn., on March 4, 2010. On Wednesday, President Biden announced his intent to appoint her U.S. treasurer in a historic first. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Jerome Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee on June 22, 2022 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Powell says recession 'a possibility' but not likely

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