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My Favorite Tax Loophole

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Should we worry about another dot-com bust?

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Freight rail cars sit in a rail yard in Wilmington, California, on November 22, 2022. This week, President Biden urged Congress to pass legislation to prevent a rail strike that could have brought trains to a halt nationwide. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some rail workers say Biden "turned his back on us" in deal to avert rail strike

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David Koehn, general manager of the Black Bayou Water Association in Mississippi, inspects a glass of tap water. Stephan Bisaha for NPR hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha for NPR

Water works (except when it doesn't)

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An oil tanker is moored at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia, Oct. 11, one of the largest facilities for oil and petroleum products in southern Russia. The deadline is looming for Western allies to agree on a price cap on Russia oil. AP hide caption

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AP

Rescued chickens gather in an aviary at Farm Sanctuary's Southern California Sanctuary on Oct. 5 in Acton, Calif. A wave of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu has entered Southern California, driven by wild bird migration. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

What we know about the deadliest U.S. bird flu outbreak in history

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A builder sands the body of a guitar at the Fender factory, in Corona, California, on October 6, 2022. Industries sensitive to rising interest rates have been slowing hiring. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. gained 263,000 jobs last month. It's good news for workers, but not the Fed

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In this photo illustration, the LastPass logo is reflected on the internal discs of a hard drive in 2017 in London. On Wednesday, the password service reported "unusual activity" within a third-party cloud storage service but said that customers' passwords remain safely encrypted. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

The Google Doodle on Dec. 1 honors Jerry Lawson on what would have been his 82nd birthday. The engineer and entrepreneur created the technology that paved the way for modern gaming. Google/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google/Screenshot by NPR

Lucy Greco (left), a web-accessibility specialist at the University of California, Berkeley, is blind. She reads most of her documents online, but employs Liza Schlosser-Olroyd as an aide to sort through her paper mail every other month, to make sure Greco hasn't missed a bill or other important correspondence. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Antwon McGhee is one of about 500 Warrior Met Coal miners in Brookwood, Ala., who have been on strike for 20 months. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Alabama coal miners begin their 20th month on strike

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In this Feb. 27, 2020, file photo, the DoorDash app is shown on a smartphone in New York. DoorDash is cutting more than 1,200 corporate jobs, saying it hired too many people when demand for its services increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. AP hide caption

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AP

Andrew Ross Sorkin speaks with FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried during the New York Times DealBook Summit in the Appel Room at the Jazz At Lincoln Center on November 30, 2022 in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Sam Bankman-Fried strikes apologetic pose as he describes being shocked by FTX's fall

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How Elon bought Twitter with other people's money

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The outside of Twitter's headquarters in San Francisco last month. The upheaval at the influential social media company threatens to make political violence worse around the world, according to human rights activists. Constanza Hevia/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Constanza Hevia/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter's chaos could make political violence worse outside of the U.S.

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