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Lorie Smith, the owner of 303 Creative, a website design company in Colorado, speaks Monday to reporters outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Supreme Court hears case of web designer who doesn't want to work on same-sex weddings

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Traffic passes through Tonopah, Nev. on Oct. 6, 2022. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

There's a lithium mining boom, but it's not a jobs bonanza

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Before COVID, business in Beijing was booming. Dercon says one of the reasons state-led development in China has been so successful is because the country had a strong state to begin with. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

To close America's remaining coal plants, many industry analysts believe the country needs natural gas to ensure reliable energy supplies until cleaner options like battery storage are widely available. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. wants to slash carbon emissions from power plants. Natural gas is in the way

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Exterior of the Castro Theatre in San Francisco. Live concert and comedy company, Another Planet Entertainment (APE), recently took over the historic movie theater's lease. Miikka Skaffari/Getty Images hide caption

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Miikka Skaffari/Getty Images

A fight over seats could define the future of an iconic San Francisco movie theater

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Lachlan Murdoch is set to be deposed in the $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against Fox News Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dominion to depose Fox boss Lachlan Murdoch as defamation suit heats up

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Members of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions shout slogans during a rally against the government's labor policy near the National Assembly in Seoul on Saturday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

It can be hard to find children's fever-reducing medication in some areas. At a Bed Bath & Beyond in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, a few products were in stock while others were sold out. Laurel Wamsley/NPR hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

My Favorite Tax Loophole

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Should we worry about another dot-com bust?

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Freight rail cars sit in a rail yard in Wilmington, California, on November 22, 2022. This week, President Biden urged Congress to pass legislation to prevent a rail strike that could have brought trains to a halt nationwide. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some rail workers say Biden "turned his back on us" in deal to avert rail strike

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David Koehn, general manager of the Black Bayou Water Association in Mississippi, inspects a glass of tap water. Stephan Bisaha for NPR hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha for NPR

Water works (except when it doesn't)

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An oil tanker is moored at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia, Oct. 11, one of the largest facilities for oil and petroleum products in southern Russia. The deadline is looming for Western allies to agree on a price cap on Russia oil. AP hide caption

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AP

Rescued chickens gather in an aviary at Farm Sanctuary's Southern California Sanctuary on Oct. 5 in Acton, Calif. A wave of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu has entered Southern California, driven by wild bird migration. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

What we know about the deadliest U.S. bird flu outbreak in history

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A builder sands the body of a guitar at the Fender factory, in Corona, California, on October 6, 2022. Industries sensitive to rising interest rates have been slowing hiring. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. gained 263,000 jobs last month. It's good news for workers, but not the Fed

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In this photo illustration, the LastPass logo is reflected on the internal discs of a hard drive in 2017 in London. On Wednesday, the password service reported "unusual activity" within a third-party cloud storage service but said that customers' passwords remain safely encrypted. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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