Business and Financial News Find the latest business news with reports on Wall Street, interest rates, banking, companies, and U.S. and world financial markets. Subscribe to the Business Story of the Day podcast.

Business

Trump appointee Michael Pack resigned as the head of the federal agency over the Voice of America and other broadcasters at President Biden's request. U.S. Agency for Global Media hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Agency for Global Media

Tenants' rights advocates protesting evictions during the pandemic in Boston this month. They want the Biden administration to not only extend, but also strengthen, an eviction order from the CDC aimed at keeping people in their homes during the outbreak. Michael Dwyer/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Dwyer/AP

The Keystone XL pipeline was set to have passed near the White River in South Dakota. President Biden plans to block the controversial pipeline in one of his first acts of office. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Embracing Modern Monetary Theory is like staring at this optical illusion. You can look at the same thing, and see things totally differently. Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons

Modern Monetary Theory (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958854717/958927220" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
JOHN THYS/AFP via Getty Images

The Social Media Crisis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958542152/958554840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President-elect Joe Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, Janet Yellen, here in 2019, is urging greater federal spending to cope with the pandemic and to help boost the struggling economy. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Yellen Urges Congress To 'Act Big' To Prop Up Pandemic-Scarred Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958316653/958472514" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Baltimore is struggling to pay for the massive infrastructure and public health costs associated with global warming. As in many cities, flood risk has dramatically increased as the Earth has gotten hotter. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Kellman/NPR

Supreme Court Considers Baltimore Suit Against Oil Companies Over Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956005206/958472526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk in Wuhan on Jan. 10, the eve of the first anniversary of China confirming its first COVID-19 death. Chinese officials said on Monday that its economy managed to grow 2.3% in 2020. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Gary Gensler, pictured during a Senate hearing in July 2013, will be nominated to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission for the Biden administration. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

There's plenty of social distance out on the slopes, but resorts are requiring masks in lift lines and lodges and limiting lodge use. Most skiers and boarders are happy to comply but Schweitzer Mountain in Idaho had to suspend season passes for some who refused to wear masks and were verbally abusive to lift line attendants. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hide caption

toggle caption
Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Ski Down and Mask Up — Resorts Try To Stay Safe In Pandemic Skiing Boom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957221195/958120802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gab was founded in 2016 as an almost anti-Twitter. The platform embraces far-right and other extremist provocateurs, including Milo Yiannopoulos and Alex Jones, who have been banned from Facebook and Twitter over incendiary posts. Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters

Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957512634/957779191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Parler, founded in Nevada in 2018, bills itself as an alternative to "ideological suppression" at other social networks. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

What's Next For Social Media After Trump? Plus The Lie Of 'Laziness'

A lot of the pro-Trump extremism behind the attack on the Capitol flourished online. Sam talks to Bobby Allyn and Shannon Bond, who both cover tech for NPR, about social platforms and the actions they've taken since the siege, the implications for free speech and whether the internet could fundamentally change. Also, Sam talks to Devon Price, author of the book Laziness Does Not Exist, about the lie of laziness and what it means for productivity.

What's Next For Social Media After Trump? Plus The Lie Of 'Laziness'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956822951/957467269" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Christopher Polk/Getty Images

The Beigies: Traffic Jam At The Ports

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957256939/957452614" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amazon cut off Parler from its Web hosting service, knocking the social media site offline. Hollie Adams/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hollie Adams/Getty Images

Parler Executive Responds To Amazon Cutoff And Defends Approach To Moderation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957234803/957407106" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People line up on Thursday for the first day of Clark County's pilot COVID-19 vaccination program at Cashman Center in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

COVID-19 Supply Deal Lets Vaccine Maker Earmark Doses For Employees And Their Families

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/957297895/957813232" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">