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People walk by a hiring sign in a store window in New York on Nov. 17. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

How understaffed are stores? Smaller retailers feel the holiday-shopping strain

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The Krause House DAO is a group organized by cryptocurrency fans that is raising money to attempt to purchase an NBA franchise. Krause House DAO hide caption

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Krause House DAO

Jennifer Beecher, left, and her sister-in-law Ashley Beecher, right, enjoy going shopping on Black Friday at Best Buy, Friday, Nov. 26, 2021, in Houston. This year is the first time the pair has arrived before dawn to shop. T Marie D. De Jesús/Houston Chronicle/AP hide caption

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Marie D. De Jesús/Houston Chronicle/AP

Supporters of All India Kisan Sangharsh Coordination Committee, a group of farmers' organizations, hold flags during a protest to mark one year since the introduction of divisive farm laws and to demand the withdrawal of the Electricity Amendment Bill, in Hyderabad, India, on Thursday. Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noah Seelam/AFP/Getty Images

A sign promote sales at a clothing store in a Colorado mall. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Yes, we are shopping way more than ever

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A cannabis leaf is put on a "Crazy Happy Pizza" at a restaurant in Bangkok, Thailand, an under-the-radar product topped with a cannabis leaf. It's legal but won't get you high. Sakchai Lalit/AP hide caption

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Sakchai Lalit/AP

Planet Money's Treasury Bill Kenny Malone hide caption

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Kenny Malone

Day of the debt

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Producers plan to tap 7 million more maple trees to meet syrup demand. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Canada taps into strategic reserves to deal with massive shortage ... of maple syrup

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(Photo credit should read ANDY BUCHANAN/AFP via Getty Images) ANDY BUCHANAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDY BUCHANAN/AFP via Getty Images

You asked for real raises, free shipping, and a special delivery

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Indicators-giving! How Much Does Thanksgiving Cost This Year?

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Rich Fury/Getty Images for LA Pride

Ticket scalpers: The real ticket masters

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Elizabeth Holmes walks into federal court in San Jose, Calif., on Monday. Holmes is accused of duping elite financial backers, customers and patients into believing that her startup was about to revolutionize medicine. Nic Coury/AP hide caption

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Nic Coury/AP

Ex-Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes takes the witness stand in her fraud trial

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Oxycodone pills. A federal jury in Ohio on Tuesday found major pharmacy chains liable for helping to fuel the opioid crisis. Marie Hickman/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Hickman/Getty Images

3 of America's biggest pharmacy chains have been found liable for the opioid crisis

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Paris Muhammad, CEO of Paris Place LLC, at the ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrating the moment she made history as the youngest member of the Conyers-Rockdale Chamber of Commerce in Georgia. Tenisha Odom hide caption

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Tenisha Odom

She's only 10 years old, but she's already the CEO of her very own cosmetics company

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Two former Netflix employees who raised concerns about anti-transgender comments on Dave Chappelle's TV special are dropping labor complaints and one has resigned from the company. Chappelle is shown here on Nov. 6 in Las Vegas. Steve Marcus/AP hide caption

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Steve Marcus/AP

Down North Pizza employee Myles Jackson presents a pie from the oven. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Former inmates are cooking up some of Philly's best pizza

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Jeromonomics 2.0

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HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra says doctors who are balking at the rules of the No Surprises Act aren't looking out for patients. "I don't think when someone is overcharging that it's going to hurt the overcharger to now have to [accept] a fair price," Becerra says. The Congressional Budget Office estimates the Biden team's rules would push insurance premiums down by 0.5% to 1%. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images