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A screen on the trading floor displays the Dow Jones Industrial Average at the New York Stock Exchange in September. Stocks have kept falling since then and hit their low for the year on Friday. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Kelly/Reuters

Stocks and bonds both get clobbered this time. Here's what's behind the double whammy

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Housing, yen, supply chains vs. the Fed

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Econ's Brush with the Law

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Activists unfurled a banner calling David Malpass a climate denier on the World Bank headquarters after he refused to say if he believed man-made emissions contributed to global warming. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

NPR news chief Nancy Barnes will leave the network in November. She announced her departure on the same day that NPR said it would hire a chief content officer to oversee both news and programming. Wanyu Zhang/Wanyu Zhang hide caption

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Wanyu Zhang/Wanyu Zhang

Protesters gather in front of the embassy of Iran in Berlin, on Tuesday after the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in the custody of Iran's morality police. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on September 21, 2022 in New York City. Stocks dropped in the final hour of trading after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell announced that the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point in an attempt to continue to tame inflation. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Stock markets drop as Wall Street takes a gloomy view of the economy

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Nancy Galarza looks Thursday at the damage that Hurricane Fiona inflicted on her community, which remained cut off days after the storm slammed the rural community of San Salvador in the town of Caguas, Puerto Rico. Danica Coto/AP hide caption

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Danica Coto/AP

Video of Amy Cooper calling the police Monday on a man has gone viral on social media. The man says he asked Cooper to put her dog on a leash in New York's Central Park. Christian Cooper via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Christian Cooper via Facebook/Screenshot by NPR

An Uber driver arrives to pick up a passenger in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing will pay $200 million to settle SEC charges over 737 Max crashes

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Donna Dunn, 49, works as the office manager at a healthcare clinic in Booker, Texas. Despite getting a raise, she has struggled to pay her family's bills as prices have risen faster than her paycheck. Donna Dunn hide caption

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Donna Dunn

Workers are changing jobs and getting raises, and still struggling financially

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Yaroslav Holovatenko (left) and a friend with their McDonald's meals in Kyiv on Wednesday. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

McDonald's reopens in Ukraine, feeding customers' nostalgia — and future hopes

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Bennett Markow looks to his big brother, Eli (right), during a family visit at UC Davis Children's Hospital in Sacramento. Bennett was born four months early, in November 2020. Crissa Markow hide caption

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Crissa Markow

The heartbreak and cost of losing a baby in America

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Tesla is recalling nearly 1.1 million vehicles in the U.S. because the windows can pinch a person's fingers when being rolled up. AP/David Zalubowski, File hide caption

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AP/David Zalubowski, File
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