Business and Financial News Find the latest business news with reports on Wall Street, interest rates, banking, companies, and U.S. and world financial markets. Subscribe to the Business Story of the Day podcast.

Business

Karen Speros, 82, waits for a movie to start at a Regal movie theater in Irvine, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jae C. Hong/AP

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

The movie industry is hurting. Most theaters in the U.S. are still shut down, and who knows when—or if—audiences will pack into theaters again. Adam B. Vary and Angelique Jackson of Variety talk about the state of the movie industry and how it's adapted, for better or worse, in this pandemic. Also, Sam talks to actor LeVar Burton about reading, why we like being read to, what he really wanted you to learn from Reading Rainbow, and the latest season of his podcast LeVar Burton Reads.

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914003928/914513929" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Nicole Xu for NPR

How The Pandemic Is Widening The Racial Wealth Gap

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/912731744/914343901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced on Thursday that certain sectors in most of the state can expand their occupancy limits starting Monday. He also said that hospitals in those regions can now resume elective procedures and that eligible long-term care facilities can resume limited visitation next week. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

A person on a bike rides by a sign in New York City urging people to stay home in May. As the pandemic drags on, some workers are facing tough choices — balancing potential risks of unwittingly spreading the disease against the possibility of losing pay during a quarantine. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cindy Ord/Getty Images

As Pandemic Stretches On, Revealing Possible Exposure Can Be Costly To Workers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911952572/914103109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Millions of gig workers have come to depend on a government lifeline that's set to expire at the end of the year. Above, a man wearing a face mask walks past a sign saying "now hiring" on May 14 in Arlington, Va. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Gig Workers Depend On New Unemployment Program, But Fear It'll End Soon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913768210/914208079" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Earlier this year, Monster City Studios, a company that normally makes amusement park and movie props, pivoted to manufacturing MCS face shields with forehead protection. It was one of many small companies to make the switch. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why Can't America Make Enough N95 Masks? 6 Months Into Pandemic, Shortages Persist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913093387/913480931" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Workers with disabilities can be paid less than minimum wage. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights says that has trapped workers in "exploitative and discriminatory" job programs. erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
erhui1979/ DigitalVision Vectors/Getty Images

Workers With Disabilities Can Earn Just $3.34 An Hour. Agency Says Law Needs Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/912840482/913900457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Icons for the smartphone apps TikTok and WeChat are seen on a smartphone screen in Beijing. President Trump said he does not plan to support any deal to save TikTok in the U.S. that keeps China-based ByteDance as its majority owner. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP
D-Keine/Getty Images

After The Plague

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913735599/913752492" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

How Immigration Is Changing The U.S. Economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913664417/913709616" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, shown here last month in Brooklyn, says that he and employees in his office will take furloughs to reduce costs. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has said the Fed is ready to support the economy as a recovery falters. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Bobby Parker, showing off his tattoo that reads "Only God Can Judge Me," says he had to sleep outside when he was locked out of his New Orleans home. Katy Reckdahl hide caption

toggle caption
Katy Reckdahl

Thrown Out Of Home, At A Time When A Roof Is More Important Than Ever

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913033306/913693836" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The campaign, #StopHateForProfit, is aimed at Facebook and Instagram and has attracted celebrities such as Kim Kardashian West. Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

People walk through the newly reopened mall at Hudson Yards in New York. U.S. shoppers spent more prudently in August and retail sales grew a tepid 0.6% from July. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Two million Americans have started freelancing in the past 12 months, according to a new study from Upwork, a freelance job platform. And that has increased the proportion of the workforce that performs freelance work to 36%. Ada Yokota/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ada Yokota/Getty Images

Jobs In The Pandemic: More Are Freelance And May Stay That Way Forever

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/912744566/913358968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Boeing 737 Max heads to a landing past grounded Max jets at Seattle's Boeing Field after a test flight in June. It was the first of three days of recertification test flights that mark a step toward returning the aircraft to passenger service. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Elaine Thompson/AP

Congressional Inquiry Faults Boeing And FAA Failures For Deadly 737 Max Plane Crashes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/913426448/913467463" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People wait for a bus in August in East Los Angeles. Latinos have the highest rate of labor force participation of any group in California — many in public-facing jobs deemed essential. That work has put them at higher risk of catching the coronavirus. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images