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Hiroki Koga, co-founder of the Oishii Farm in New Jersey, cultivated the Omakase berry, which is distinguished by its strong aroma and sweetness. He says he was unimpressed with the quality of produce in the U.S. Courtesy of Oishii hide caption

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Courtesy of Oishii

MICHAEL MILKEN IN LOS ANGELES (Photo by Ted Soqui/Sygma via Getty Images) Ted Soqui/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Soqui/Sygma via Getty Images

Episode 974: Michael Milken

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The Indicator The Candidates Should Be Talking About

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Authorities say Wells Fargo bank managers were aware of illegal conduct as early as 2002 but allowed it to continue until 2016. Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Dilts/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Wells Fargo Paying $3 Billion To Settle U.S. Case Over Fraudulent Customer Accounts

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Shake Shack shortened managers' workweeks to four days at some stores a year and a half ago. Recently, the burger chain expanded the trial to a third of its U.S. stores. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Enjoy The Extra Day Off! More Bosses Give 4-Day Workweek A Try

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Calvin Brandford (center) is a certified minority contractor who has run an excavation business north of Boston for almost 30 years. Brandford said getting state-funded work as a subcontractor is very hard and often comes with a serious drawback: not getting paid for 60 to 90 days. Chris Burrell/WGBH hide caption

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Chris Burrell/WGBH

Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

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A logo for Hornbeck Offshore Services, the company from which Team Indicator bought two junk bonds last year. Derick E. Hingle /Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Derick E. Hingle /Bloomberg via Getty Images

Meet Our Junk Bond!

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Mustafa Nuur, 27, stands outside of his family's food stand in Lancaster City, Pa. Cardiff Garcia /NPR hide caption

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Cardiff Garcia /NPR

Episode 973: Indicate This

From our daily podcast The Indicator: How Amazon Prime packages reach you so damn fast? And why Lancaster, PA became the refugee capital of America?

Episode 973: Indicate This

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Research & Development associate Divya Nagalati works on cell cultures in Regeneron's infectious disease labs in Tarrytown, N.Y. The firm is looking for tailored antibodies that might prove useful against the new coronavirus. Rani Levy hide caption

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Rani Levy

Hunt For New Coronavirus Treatments Includes Gene-Silencing And Monoclonal Antibodies

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An entrance to a dormitory for Foxconn workers. China's factories normally ramp up production right after the Lunar New Year, but few workers have returned so far this year. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

The Wide-Ranging Ways In Which The Coronavirus Is Hurting Global Business

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A masked paramilitary policeman stands guard alone at a deserted Tiananmen Gate in Beijing following the coronavirus outbreak. China on Wednesday said it has revoked the press credentials of three U.S. reporters over a headline for an opinion column it deems racist and slanderous. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Until very recently, the separate company that runs the emergency department at Nashville General Hospital was continuing to haul patients who couldn't pay medical bills into court. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

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A stockpile of salt for de-icing roads and sidewalks. ANDREW YATES/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW YATES/AFP via Getty Images

Listener Questions: Minimum Wage & Gender-Fluid Tadpoles

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Sleep trackers have become increasingly popular, but for some people, perfecting their sleep score becomes an end unto itself. Yiu Yu Hoi/Getty Images hide caption

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Yiu Yu Hoi/Getty Images

Losing Sleep Over The Quest For A Perfect Night's Rest

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