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A screenshot of an Instagram post Facebook linked to Russia's Internet Research Agency. United World International was a phony website created by the Russian operation and promoted on social media. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

Gretchen Goldman shared this behind-the-scenes photo on Twitter of what it's like to work from home and parent during the pandemic. Gretchen Goldman hide caption

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Gretchen Goldman

When A Tornado Hits A Toy Store: Photo Shows Reality Of Working From Home With Kids

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United Airlines baggage tags are displayed on a table at San Francisco International Airport. The carrier says it's starting a pilot program next month that will offer rapid coronavirus testing at the airport or via a self-collected, mail-in test ahead of a flight. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Halloween is one more thing being upended by the pandemic. Federal guidelines advise against traditional trick or treating, but parents across the country are trying to make the holiday special for their children anyway. Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Nelson/Getty Images

The office of Capital Area Food Bank stands empty in Washington in March. Many companies across the country have adopted work-from-home policies, raising concerns among some employers that some of the office buzz is gone. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Jesus Gonzalez of Lexington, Ky., has been struggling to make ends meet after the $600 per week in extra federal unemployment benefits ran out. Stacy Kranitz for NPR hide caption

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Stacy Kranitz for NPR

'Desperation And Fear' For Millions With Congress Deadlocked Over Pandemic Assistance

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Visual China Group/Visual China Group via Getty Images

The Invention Of Paper Money

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In this photo illustration, a TikTok logo seen displayed on a smartphone with a ByteDance logo picture in the background. Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
Steven Clevenger/Corbis via Getty Images

REDMAP (Update)

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Demonstrators march in Chicago's Old Town neighborhood in June to demand a lifting of the Illinois rent control ban and a cancellation of rent and mortgage payments. The pandemic's financial pressures are causing many Americans to struggle with rent payments. Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

'No One Can Live Off $240 A Week': Many Americans Struggle To Pay Rent, Bills

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Attorney General William Barr and President Donald Trump want to pare back longstanding legal protections for Internet platforms. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Citigroup estimates the U.S. economy lost $16 trillion over the past 20 years as a result of discrimination against African Americans. Above, the American flag hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange on Sept. 21. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Boxes of Uncle Ben Converted Rice on a store shelf. Mars, Incorporated announced on Wednesday that it is changing the name of the brand to Ben's Original. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

Sizzler USA has filed for bankruptcy as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions. Here, drivers pass a closed Sizzler restaurant in Montebello, Calif. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Huda Mohamed, a student at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., has an immunodeficiency. She decided to take extra precautions by using Virginia's COVIDWISE app, which alerts users who may have been exposed to the coronavirus. Such apps are only available in a few states. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

A Tech Powerhouse, U.S. Lags In Using Smartphones For Contact Tracing

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Buildings are engulfed in flames as a wildfire ravages Talent, Ore., on Sept. 8, 2020. Unfounded rumors that left-wing activists were behind the fires went viral on social media, thanks to amplification by conspiracy theorists and the platforms' own design. Kevin Jantzer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Jantzer/AP

Can Circuit Breakers Stop Viral Rumors On Facebook, Twitter?

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Facebook says the fake accounts it removed focused mainly on Southeast Asia. But they also included some content about the U.S. election, which did not gain a large following. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Forbes journalist Dan Alexander writes about the president's potential conflicts of interest in White House, Inc. "You can't have a blind trust and have a building that says 'Trump Tower' on the outside of [it]," Alexander says. "How blind is that?" Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

'White House, Inc.' Author: Trump's Businesses Offer 'A Million Potential Conflicts'

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A worker pushes a cart past refrigerators at a Home Depot in Boston in January, before the coronavirus pandemic threw a monkey wrench into the supply and demand of major appliances. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

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