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A Delta Air Lines jet taxis past Southwest Airlines jets to be parked with a growing number of jets at Southern California Logistics Airport on Tuesday in Victorville, Calif. Airlines around the world are scrambling to find places to park planes. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Relief Package Includes Billions For Boeing And Airlines

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The economic rescue package passed by the Senate this week would let gig workers and other self-employed people seek unemployment benefits they wouldn't normally qualify for. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Gig Workers Would Get Unemployment Safety Net In Rescue Package

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A truck leaves the highway at the Hefner Road exit of I-35 in Oklahoma City on March 20. Truckers say that the impact from the coronavirus is twofold: Some have more loads now because of shortages, while others say that their customers are not ordering and have cut their runs down. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

President Trump signs the CARES act, a $2 trillion rescue package to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus outbreak, at the Oval Office of the White House on Friday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook says it's directing users across its platforms to more reliable information from established public health organizations in order to prevent the spread of false content. Facebook hide caption

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Facebook

How Facebook Wants To Handle Misinformation Around The Coronavirus Epidemic

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About 90% of households — approximately 165 million — will benefit from direct payments, according to the Tax Policy Center. Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images
ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images

The Labor Market Catastrophe

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Empty parking lots surround an Amazon distribution center in Shepherdsville, Ky., that has been closed for cleaning after several employees tested positive for COVID-19. Bryan Woolston/Reuters hide caption

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Bryan Woolston/Reuters

A "closed" sign is posted at the entrance of a New York State Department of Labor office in Brooklyn. With millions of people filing for unemployment benefits, state employment agencies have been overwhelmed around the country. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Kelly/Reuters

Professor Robert Kelly, his wife, Kim Jung-A, and their children Marion and James spoke to the BBC about the challenge of balancing work and family life during the coronavirus crisis. BBC / Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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BBC / Screenshot by NPR