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Yuko Watanabe's biggest pivot was starting to sell plants at her Yuko Kitchen restaurants in Los Angeles. Yuko Watanabe hide caption

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Yuko Watanabe

Restaurants Reinvent Themselves For Thanksgiving And Beyond: 'You Just Pivot'

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Swamp Gravy Colquitt Miller Arts Council hide caption

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Colquitt Miller Arts Council

Swamp Gravy (UPDATE)

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Thanksgiving Dinner Is The Cheapest In 35 Years

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Kelly Fields, owner and chef of the award-winning New Orleans restaurant Willa Jean, fears what another shutdown could mean for her business. Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Audi hide caption

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Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images for Audi

'It Is Slightly Terrifying.' New Orleans Chef Braces For A Bittersweet Thanksgiving

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Some workers at Amazon warehouses such as this one in the Staten Island borough of New York City have been trying to organize, facing stiff opposition from the company. Amazon workers in Alabama have now petitioned to form a union. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

A protester holds a sign to protest measures in Miami to close indoor seating amid a rise in coronavirus cases. The number of unemployment claims rose for a second week, reinforcing concerns about the economy. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Yulia Reznikov/Getty Images

As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

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A Tesla car powers up at a charging station in Petaluma, Calif., on Sept. 23. Automakers are trying to convince would-be electric car buyers to adopt new habits to power their vehicles. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Nice Car, But How Do You Charge That Thing? Let Us Count The Ways

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk visits the construction site of a future Tesla plant near Berlin on Sept. 3. Musk is now the world's second-richest person, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images

The Charging Bull statue is shown in New York's financial district. The Dow surpassed 30,000 points for the first time after President Trump allowed the transition process to begin. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The Salvation Army's red-kettle campaign is expecting fewer donations and volunteers this year as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP