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Former Google AI research scientist Timnit Gebru, shown in September 2018, says she was abruptly fired from the tech giant after a dispute involving a research paper. Kimberly White/Getty Images for TechCrunch hide caption

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Kimberly White/Getty Images for TechCrunch

Google Employees Call Black Scientist's Ouster 'Unprecedented Research Censorship'

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Dan Istitene - Formula 1/Formula 1 via Getty Images

The Beigies: Some Economic Bright Spots

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A minimum three-week stay-at-home order is expected in much of California as hospitals experience an unprecedented surge in COVID-19 patients in intensive care units. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Patio tables are empty at a diner this week in West Hollywood, Calif., after Los Angeles County banned outdoor dining amid the pandemic. The struggles of restaurants and retailers are expected to have led to sharply slower job growth last month. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's minister of energy, chairs a virtual Group of 20 ministers meeting in April. The Saudi-led OPEC cartel decided to boost production modestly amid considerable uncertainty about the global economy. Saudi Energy Ministry via AP hide caption

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Saudi Energy Ministry via AP

As governments around the world prepare to approve the first coronavirus vaccines, social media companies are cracking down on hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Jimmy Lai, publisher of the China-skeptic Apple Daily newspaper, is seen in custody in Hong Kong on Thursday. Charged with fraud, he can expect to be in custody until at least April 16, when his case will be heard next. Anthony Kwan/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Getty Images

All health plans sold on HealthCare.Gov or one of state insurance exchanges are governed by Affordable Care Act rules. That means they have to provide comprehensive benefits to all applicants, regardless of their health or "preexisting conditions." But short-term plans and many others aren't bound by such restrictions. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Losing unemployment insurance can lead to serious health problems for those affected, according to new research. And it may result in deaths that are not directly from the coronavirus. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Losing Jobless Benefits Is Not Only Stressful, It Might Be Harmful To Health

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Google has been rocked by activism among employees who have grown increasingly critical of the company in recent years over issues ranging from sexual harassment to contracts with the U.S. government. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP
KONTROLAB/KONTROLAB/LightRocket via Getty

The Economics of America's Nurse Shortage

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San Francisco-based Hamish McKenzie, Chris Best and Jairaj Sethi are the co-founders of the email newsletter platform Substack, which has seen its active writers more than double since the start of the pandemic. Substack hide caption

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Substack

Tired Of The Social Media Rat Race, Journalists Move To Writing Substack Newsletters

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A lab technician for the company Co-Diagnostics prepares components for a coronavirus test in March in Salt Lake City. The company has come under scrutiny regarding its tests' accuracy and stock sales by leadership at the company. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Stock Sales By Leaders At Coronavirus Testing Company Raise Legal Concerns

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Headaches, lung issues and ongoing, debilitating fatigue are just a few of the symptoms plaguing some "long hauler" COVID-19 patients for months or more after the initial fever and acute symptoms recede. Grace Cary/Getty Images hide caption

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Grace Cary/Getty Images

Sen. Mark Warner speaks alongside a bipartisan group of lawmakers as they announce a proposal for a $908 billion coronavirus relief bill on Tuesday. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Millions Face Bitter Winter If Congress Fails To Extend Relief Programs

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President Trump tweeted late Tuesday that he is considering vetoing the must-pass defense authorization bill unless Congress approves changes to the legal shield that protects tech companies from liability from third-party content. Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff/Pool/Getty Images

An Exxon station in Hicksville, N.Y., in March. Exxon Mobil Corp. announced up to $20 billion in write-downs of natural gas assets, the biggest such action ever by the company. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Exxon Writes Off Record Amount From Value of Assets Amid Energy Market Downturn

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