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Postmaster General Louis DeJoy speaks during a House Oversight Committee hearing about the U.S. Postal Service on Wednesday. Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/Pool/Getty Images

Under Pressure, Postmaster General Calls For Changes To Mail Delivery

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Aniya's overnight shift at an Amazon warehouse became impractical when daycare and school were canceled for her two children because of the pandemic. She was able to avoid eviction with the help of a lawyer and emergency rental assistance but she recently received a letter saying that her lease would not be renewed and she had to vacate the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium

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Concierge health care provider One Medical allowed patients who were not eligible — and those with connections to the company's leadership — to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line ahead of high-risk patients. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

High-End Medical Provider Let Ineligible People Skip COVID-19 Vaccine Line

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Five out-of-state members of a major Texas electricity grid operator are resigning following winter storm Uri that hit the state and knocked out coal, natural gas and nuclear plants that were unprepared for the freezing temperatures brought on by the storm. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenn Liv for NPR

How To Ask For A Raise: Know Your Value (And Bring The Evidence)

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United Airlines Flight 328 approaching Denver International Airport, after experiencing "a right-engine failure" shortly after takeoff from Denver. The FAA issued an order on Tuesday grounding all aircraft powered by the same Pratt & Whitney 4000-112 engine until they've been inspected. Hayden Smith/AP hide caption

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Hayden Smith/AP
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Seeking Refuge On The Open Road

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Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Saudi Arabia's then-oil minister on Dec. 1, 1973, in London during talks on the oil crisis. Roger Jackson/Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Key To Making Saudi Arabia A World Oil Power, Dies At 90

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Chris Quinn, editor of cleveland.com and the Cleveland Plain Dealer, is at the forefront of a crop of news editors taking a hard look at the implications of how they have defined news. David Petkiewicz/Dave Petkiewicz/cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer hide caption

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David Petkiewicz/Dave Petkiewicz/cleveland.com and The Plain Dealer

From Cleveland To Boston, Newsrooms Revisit Old Stories To Offer A 'Fresh Start'

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Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies during a House Financial Services Committee hearing on Dec. 2, 2020. Powell appeared before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday and argued the U.S. economy still has a long way to go to recover millions of lost jobs. Jim Lo Scalzo/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Fed Chair Jerome Powell Warns Of Long Road Ahead To Recover Millions Of Lost Jobs

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Alabama: The Newest Union Battleground

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A protester carries a sign that reads "Defund The Police" during the Black Women Matter "Say Her Name" march last July in Richmond, Va. Eze Amos/Getty Images hide caption

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Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

As Cities Grapple With Climate Change, Gas Utilities Fight To Stay In Business

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Power lines near Houston on Feb. 16. Some Texas residents are facing enormous power bills after wholesale prices for electricity skyrocketed amid last week's massive grid failure. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

A lower-carbon natural gas flame burns on a stovetop at a NW Natural testing facility. Cassandra Profita/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Cassandra Profita/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Natural Gas Companies Have Their Own Plans To Go Low-Carbon

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Debris is scattered in the front yard of a house in Broomfield, Colo., on Saturday. A commercial airliner dropped debris in Colorado neighborhoods during an emergency landing. Broomfield Police Department via AP hide caption

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Broomfield Police Department via AP

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, pictured in July 2020 in Geneva, will head the WTO beginning in March. She wants countries to drop restrictions on the export of vaccines and other medical supplies. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Controls On Vaccine Exports 'Hold Back' Pandemic Recovery, Warns Incoming WTO Head

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