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Tesla CEO Elon Musk delivers his opening monologue on "Saturday Night Live" last week in an image released by NBC. Musk tweeted on Wednesday that Tesla would no longer accept cryptocurrency Bitcoin for car purchases. Will Heath/NBC via AP hide caption

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Will Heath/NBC via AP

President Biden alluded to the Colonial Pipeline cyberattack in his new executive order. Here, storage tanks at a Colonial Pipeline facility are seen Wednesday in Avenel, N.J. Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Breanna Stewart of the Seattle Storm announced a deal for a signature shoe with sports brand Puma. Julio Aguilar/Getty Images hide caption

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Julio Aguilar/Getty Images

Stewie Gets Her Own Sneaks: WNBA Star Pens First Deal In A Decade

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A 'Now Hiring' sign is posted in front of a Popeye's restaurant in Miami, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Why Are So Many Businesses Struggling To Find Workers?

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Cars line up Tuesday at a QuikTrip in Atlanta. Continued panic-buying is leading to shortages at gas stations across the Southeast after a hack attack shut down a critical pipeline. Megan Varner/Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Varner/Getty Images

Colonial Restarts Operations After Cyberattack As Panic-Buying Mounts In Southeast

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A shopper's cart is full in the checkout line at a ShopRite supermarket in April 2020 in Plainview, N.Y. A year later, prices for most goods have jumped, according to government data, as companies struggle to secure critical raw materials amid supply constraints. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

Anti-vaccine advocates are using the COVID-19 pandemic to promote books, supplementals and services. Emilija Manevska/Getty Images hide caption

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Emilija Manevska/Getty Images

For Some Anti-Vaccine Advocates, Misinformation Is Part Of A Business

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Pay Taxes Less Frequently? We’re Interested...

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People who need help getting to a vaccination site will be able to get free or discounted rides through Uber and Lyft, the White House says. Here, a woman receives her first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Aberdeen, Md., after getting a ride to the site from her landlord. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In 1995, an online troll impersonated Ken Zeran on AOL, posting tasteless ads with his phone number. Zeran sued AOL, and lost. The person behind the ads has never been identified. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

How One Man's Fight Against An AOL Troll Sealed The Tech Industry's Power

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a press conference in Oakland, Calif., on Monday where he announced a new round of $600 stimulus checks residents making up to $75,000 a year. Newsom also announced a projected $75.7 billion budget surplus compared to last year's projected $54.3 billion shortfall. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Facing A Recall And A Massive Surplus, Gov. Newsom Proposes More Stimulus Checks

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The Hollywood Foreign Press Association voted last week to approve an overhaul proposal but the group's pledges of transformation have done little to reassure entertainment companies. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Hollywood Forei hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Hollywood Forei

In the neighborhood of West Adams, formerly Sugar Hill, a cul-de-sac sits against the Santa Monica Freeway. Nevil Jackson for NPR hide caption

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Nevil Jackson for NPR

How One LA Neighborhood Reveals The Racist Architecture Of American Homeownership

Property ownership eludes Black Americans more than any other racial group. NPR's Ailsa Chang and Jonaki Mehta examine why. They tell the story of LA's Sugar Hill neighborhood, a once-vibrant black community that was demolished to make way for the Santa Monica Freeway.

How One LA Neighborhood Reveals The Racist Architecture Of American Homeownership

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Hacking Business

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