Business and Financial News Find the latest business news with reports on Wall Street, interest rates, banking, companies, and U.S. and world financial markets. Subscribe to the Business Story of the Day podcast.

Business

A bid for tenure by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been opposed by a leading donor of the journalism school, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Publisher Walter Hussman. Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Peabody Awards; Benjamin Krain/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette hide caption

toggle caption
Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Peabody Awards; Benjamin Krain/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

UNC Journalism School Tried To Give Nikole Hannah-Jones Tenure. A Top Donor Objected

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007778651/1008614186" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Shipping containers are stacked high at the Port of Los Angeles in April. Supply chain disruptions are hitting small-business owners across the United States. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Cargo Is Piling Up Everywhere, And It's Making Inflation Worse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007938067/1008656381" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mannequins in a clothing shop are posed to show solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement on Juneteenth in Washington, D.C. The day in 1865 that the last enslaved Black people learned they had been freed under the Emancipation Proclamation is now a federal holiday. Maya Alleruzzo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Maya Alleruzzo/AP

Juneteenth Is A Federal Holiday Now, But What That Means For Workers Varies Widely

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1008095439/1008361294" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly difficult for unpaid caregivers, with many reporting symptoms of stress, anxiety, and depression. Portra Images via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Portra Images via Getty Images

Unpaid Caregivers Were Already Struggling. It's Only Gotten Worse During The Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007579073/1007805718" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Tim Graham/Tim Graham/Getty Images

Lordstown Motors shows off a model of its electric pickup truck, Endurance, in Lordstown, Ohio, on June 25, 2020. The auto maker is under pressure after saying it was running out of cash, raising questions about the future of the crop of startups that have entered the industry. Tony Dejak/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Dejak/AP

Startups Like Lordstown Wanted To Upend The Car Industry. It's Now Do Or Die For Them

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007241665/1007617464" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

An iPhone screengrab of Snapchat's speed filter, which allows users to record and share how fast they are moving. Snap told NPR that it is eliminating the tool. Bobby Allyn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bobby Allyn/NPR

Snapchat Ends 'Speed Filter' That Critics Say Encouraged Reckless Driving

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007385955/1007851240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, manages his shop in Lakewood, Colo. Phillips, the Colorado baker who won a partial victory at the U.S. Supreme Court in 2018 for refusing to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, violated the state's anti-discrimination law by refusing to make a birthday cake for a transgender woman. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Zalubowski/AP

Apple Daily editor-in-chief Ryan Law is escorted by police to a waiting vehicle outside the entrance of the Apple Daily newspaper offices in Hong Kong on Thursday. ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ANTHONY WALLACE/AFP via Getty Images

Police Arrest 'Apple Daily' Editors Under Hong Kong Security Law

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007473810/1007494010" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Courtesy Jeopardy Productions, Inc.

How Uncle Jamie Broke Jeopardy (Update)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007007183/1007010183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

"We are all human" and "Black Lives Matter" billboards light up Times Square on June 23, 2020 in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images

Big Companies Are Finding Out They Need Help With Diversity Messaging

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007337981/1007337982" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
miodrag ignjatovic/Getty Images

Millennial Myth-Busters: Housing Edition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1007336970/1007385749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript