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Employees elbow bump at a JLL office in Menlo Park, Calif., in September. With the delta variant surging, mask mandates are returning, and some employers are now requiring employees to be vaccinated before coming to the office. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Back To The Office? Not Yet. Companies Scramble To Adjust To The Delta Variant

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Illustration of a person standing in front of a life-sized chart showing different colors in waves and lines representing them balancing their stock portfolio. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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New To Investing? Here Are Some Common Mistakes To Avoid And Tips To Follow

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Marriage Boom: Sin City Edition

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Scarlett Johansson arrives at the BAFTA Film Awards in London last year. She is suing Disney over the company's streaming release of the movie Black Widow at the same time as the theatrical release, which she said breached her contract and deprived her of potential earnings. Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP hide caption

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Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP

Scarlett Johansson Is Suing Disney For Its Streaming Release Of 'Black Widow'

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Johnson & Johnson is facing tens of thousands of lawsuits over claims that its talcum-based products caused users to develop cancer. The company says its powder products are safe. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

People walk past a poster showing members of the K-pop group BTS in Seoul on October 12, 2020. It's one of the most popular bands in the world, with an extremely devoted fan base. Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-Je/AFP via Getty Images

People visit Downtown Disney in Anaheim, California on July 9, 2020, the first day the outdoor shopping and dining complex was open to the public since closing in March amid the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden speaks about the pandemic and the country's vaccination campaign on Thursday at the White House. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Hopes To Boost COVID Vaccination Rates By Focusing On Federal Workers

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In this 1982 file photo, Ron Popeil, the man behind those late-night, rapid-fire television commercials that sell everything from the Mr. Microphone to the Pocket Fisherman to the classic Veg-a-Matic, sits surrounded by his wares in his office in Beverly Hills, Calif. Popeil died Wednesday, his family said. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

Travelers head to a security checkpoint at Denver International Airport on July 2. The economy likely surged in the April-June quarter as vaccine rollouts sparked a surge in pent-up activity. A slowdown is now seen as inevitable, although the pace of growth should remain strong. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

The Economy Is Stronger. These 4 Things Will Determine What Happens Next

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Nine families are involved in the lawsuit against now-bankrupt Remington Arms. They claim the gun-maker is liable for the deaths of six adults and 20 children as the manufacturer and marketer of the Bushmaster assault-style rifle used in the 2012 massacre. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

In this image from video provided by the House Financial Services Committee, Vlad Tenev, chief executive officer of Robinhood, testifies during a virtual hearing on GameStop in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 18. Robinhood is facing a range of lawsuits and potential regulary action as it gears up to make its Wall Street debut. Provided by House Financial Services Committee/AP hide caption

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Provided by House Financial Services Committee/AP

The Robinhood IPO Is Here. But There Are Doubts About Its Future

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Employees walk across Blizzard Way during a walkout at Activision Blizzard offices in Irvine, Calif., on Wednesday. Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bing Guan/Bloomberg via Getty Images