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Traders work on the floor at the closing bell of the Dow Industrial Average at the New York Stock Exchange on July 26, 2018 in New York. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Administration Eyes Capital Gains Tax Cut

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Two years after Uber paid $680 million to buy the self-driving truck startup Otto, the company is folding that effort. In this photo from 2016, an Otto engineer sits behind the steering wheel of a self-driving, big-rig truck during a demonstration in San Francisco. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

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The Justice Department has ended the $61 million contract for 2020 census forms that the U.S. Government Publishing Office awarded to the now-bankrupt printing company Cenveo, which has already produced materials for this year's census test run. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Bankrupt Contractor Will Get $5.5 Million For Not Printing 2020 Census Forms

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Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, pictured in 2017, is leading a multistate lawsuit to prevent 3D-printer gun plans from being published online. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

CBS CEO and Chairman Leslie Moonves arrives arrives at a promotional boxing aprty in August 2017. The 68-year-old has been accused by six women of sexual assault and harassment. Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images for Showtime hide caption

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Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images for Showtime

Bubble tea, or boba, features large tapioca balls at the bottom meant to be sucked up through a plastic straw. Vendors say paper straws don't always work as well, and they're more expensive. Samantha Shanahan/KQED hide caption

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Samantha Shanahan/KQED

San Francisco Is Poised To Ban Plastic Straws. That's Got Bubble Tea Shops Worried

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As Ban On Plastic Straws Spreads, Demand For Paper Alternatives Increases

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Lucian Grainge, the CEO of Universal Music Group. The major label's parent company announced on July 30, 2018, that it would be selling up to 50 percent of its stake in UMG. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame

In shadow marketplaces, positive reviews for Amazon products are bought and sold. The company says it's cracking down and that it estimates that less than 1 percent of reviews are fake. Mike Segar/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Segar/Reuters

Some Amazon Reviews Are Too Good To Be Believed. They're Paid For

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CBS Board Of Directors To Meet Amid Allegations Against Moonves

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A.G. Sulzberger, publisher of The New York Times, met with President Trump earlier this month and implored him to "reconsider his broader attacks on journalism." Rob Kim/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Kim/Getty Images

The Myth Of The Self-Made Millennial

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