Children's Health NPR reports on children's health and medical news including health insurance, new treatments for diseases, and child product safety recalls. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Children's Health

The deadline for signing up for individual health insurance coverage on HealthCare.gov ends Saturday, Dec. 15. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

ACA Sign-Ups Have Lagged For 2019. But What Does That Mean?

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Scientist He Jiankui was criticized by colleagues after his claim to have created gene-edited babies became public. Three leading scientific organizations are calling for more controls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Teens' biological clock drives them to stay up late and sleep in. Most school start times don't accommodate that drive. Jasper Cole/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Cole/Getty Images
Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Research Gaps Leave Doctors Guessing About Treatments For Pregnant Women

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Angela Lautner, who lives in Elsmere, Ky., has Type 1 diabetes and is an advocate for affordable insulin. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

'We're Fighting For Our Lives': Patients Protest Sky-High Insulin Prices

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There has been a backlash since Chinese scientist He Jiankui's claim that he edited genes in embryos that became twin girls. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

Outrage Intensifies Over Claims Of Gene-Edited Babies

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Childhood infections may increase the risk of developing certain mental illnesses in childhood and adolescence. Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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Kathleen Finlay/Getty Images/Image Source

Offering therapy to children in need at school makes sense, says Sarah Nadeau, who adopted two girls from a family that struggled with addiction, because sometimes school is the only stable place they have. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

While a day or two of complete rest may be necessary for kids after a concussion, any more could leave them feeling isolated and anxious, says Angela Lumba-Brown, a pediatric emergency medicine physician who helped shape new guidelines. Gregoire Sitter/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Gregoire Sitter/EyeEm/Getty Images

Kids With Concussions Can Phase In Exercise, Screen Time Sooner Than Before

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Kristen Philman first tried methamphetamine in her early 20s, as an alternative to heroin and other opioids. When she discovered she was pregnant, she says, it was a wake-up call, and she did what she needed to do to stop using all those drugs. Theo Stroomer for NPR hide caption

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Theo Stroomer for NPR

Another Drug Crisis: Methamphetamine Use By Pregnant Women

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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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The number of children in the United States without health insurance jumped to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million the year before, according to census data. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

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Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images

Researchers zeroed in on the ages of kids when they enrolled in kindergarten to investigate discrepancies in ADHD diagnoses. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Youngest Children In A Class Are Most Likely To Get ADHD Diagnosis

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Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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Genetics researcher He Jiankui said his lab considered ethical issues before deciding to proceed with DNA editing of human embryos to create twin girls with a modification to reduce their risk of HIV infection. Critics say the experiment was premature. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Chinese Scientist Says He's First To Create Genetically Modified Babies Using CRISPR

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Four-year-old Violet (right) supervises as her mom Margaret Siebers pours a first-ever spoonful of honey for 1-year-old Frances to try. Siebers spent much of the end of her pregnancy with Frances confined to bed rest at her home in Milwaukee. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

Rethinking Bed Rest For Pregnancy

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Dr. Ruth Levesque (right) hands Shaun McDougall his newborn son Brady at South Shore Hospital in Weymouth, Mass. The birth of the second twin, Bryce, was much trickier than Brady's. Good communication between the health team and parents was crucial to safely avoiding a C-section, obstetricians say. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Twin's Difficult Birth Put A Project Designed To Reduce C-Sections To The Test

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