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Children's Health

Letmedhin Eyasu holds her one year-old son Zewila Gebru, who is suffering from malnutrition at a health center in Agbe, Ethiopia Monday, June 7, 2021. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

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Mulugeta Ayene/AP

A new study by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ties the COVID-19 pandemic to an "alarming" increase in obesity in U.S. children and teenagers. Patrick Sison/AP hide caption

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Patrick Sison/AP

According to the CDC, between March and May, 2020, hospitals across the country saw a 24% increase in mental health emergency visits by kids aged 5 to 11 years old, and a 31% increase for kids 12 to 17. Annie Otzen/Getty Images hide caption

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Annie Otzen/Getty Images

Various types of pufferfish are among those served as the gastronomic delicacy fugu. The paralyzing nerve toxin some of these fish contain is also under study by brain scientists hunting new ways to treat amblyopia. shan.shihan/Getty Images hide caption

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shan.shihan/Getty Images

Pufferfish Toxin Holds Clues To Treating 'Lazy Eye' In Adults

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For a forthcoming study, researchers with the U.K.'s University of Bath and other schools spoke to 10,000 people in 10 countries, all of whom were between the ages of 16 and 25, to gauge how they feel about climate change. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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FG Trade/Getty Images

Dr. Simone Gold discourages vaccination against COVID-19 and promotes alternative, unproven therapies. She has spent much of the past year speaking at events like this one held in West Palm Beach, Fla., in December. The conference was aimed at young people ages 15 to 25. Gage Skidmore hide caption

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Gage Skidmore

This Doctor Spread False Information About COVID. She Still Kept Her Medical License

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The Unexpected Reason Arizona's Mask Mandate Ban May Be Unconstitutional

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Students head toward Thurgood Marshall Academic High School in San Francisco in March. Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images hide caption

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Lea Suzuki/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear speaks about the increases in COVID-19 cases in the state and the opening day of the Kentucky State Legislature special session in Frankfort, Ky., Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2021. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

A young girl and her mother visit a temporary art installation, called Bear the Truth, on June 28, 2020, at the Los Angeles City Hall. The installation honors Black children who have lost their lives to racial injustice and senseless violence. Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Getting vaccinated during pregnancy is one of the best ways to make sure your vulnerable newborn benefits from your antibodies to the coronavirus, doctors say. ©fitopardo/Getty Images hide caption

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©fitopardo/Getty Images

Babies, The Delta Variant And COVID: What Parents Need To Know

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Nurses work at a COVID-19 testing day for students and school faculty at Brandeis Elementary School on in Louisville, Ky. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Caught Between Parents And Politicians, Nurses Fear Another School Year With COVID-19

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HOUSTON, TEXAS - AUGUST 23: Students at the Xavier Academy, like many schools around Houston, are required to wear masks. Staff and faculty have been vaccinated and 90% of students in attendance have also been vaccinated. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Allie Henderson with her sister Claire (left) and her mom, LeAnn, outside their home recently in Terry, Miss. "I want people to get vaccinated — because I know what it feels like," Allie says of her near-fatal encounter with COVID-19 this year. Imani Khayyam for KHN hide caption

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Imani Khayyam for KHN

Students wear mask as they arrive at school for in-person learning at Holmes Middle School in Wheeling, Ill., on Oct. 21, 2020. Students in Illinois schools will be able to take up to five excused mental or behavioral health days beginning in January 2022. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Health care providers who administer a COVID-19 vaccine "off-label" face legal liability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. Luis Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Alvarez/Getty Images

Nashville, Tenn., kindergarten teacher Amber Updegrove leads her class in a lesson this month. On Monday, the U.S. Department of Education announced an investigation into Tennessee's requirement that schools allow families to opt out of mask mandates. John Partipilo/AP hide caption

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John Partipilo/AP

Education Dept. Announces Civil Rights Investigations Into 5 States' Mask Mandate Bans

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Students head to class this month in Thornton, Colo. Infectious disease experts say the decline in vaccination rates against childhood diseases during the pandemic has increased the potential for outbreaks of diseases once largely vanquished in the United States. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Many Kids Have Missed Routine Vaccines, Worrying Doctors As School Starts

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Elaine Murphy's home in New Albany, Ind., is lined with family photos of her grandchildren. The president of the school board of the New Albany-Floyd County school district is a life-long educator. Schools were always her safe haven, but things are changing as school boards are tasked with making pandemic-related decisions. Farah Yousry/WFYI hide caption

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Farah Yousry/WFYI

She Joined The School Board To Serve Her Community. Now She's In The Crossfire

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First-graders listen to the interim superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, Megan Reilly, read a book at Normont Elementary School in Harbor City on Aug. 16, the first day of school. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images