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Children's Health

Some patients have started to seek out an oral treatment for food allergies that's not yet widely offered by clinicians. Cat Gwynn/Getty Images hide caption

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Cat Gwynn/Getty Images

Thirty-three-year-old mother Kim Nelson started a vaccine advocacy group in Greenville, S.C., to help reach vaccine-hesitant families. Here, she prepares vaccine information flyers for public school students. Alex Olgin/WFAE hide caption

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Alex Olgin/WFAE

A Parent-To-Parent Campaign To Get Vaccine Rates Up

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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In 2011, a 17-year-old named Mishka told readers of his Facebook post that his Salem, Ore., high school was "asking for a f***ing shooting." That post and other furious outbursts triggered a quick, but deep evaluation by the school district's threat assessment unit. Beth Nakamura for NPR hide caption

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Beth Nakamura for NPR

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Hesitancy about vaccination in a community has a lot to do with acculturation to its norms. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Medical Anthropologist Explores 'Vaccine Hesitancy'

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The 'Strange Science' Behind The Big Business Of Exercise Recovery

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If you fear your child may have taken or received too much medicine, call the national poison control hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Giving Medicine To Young Children? Getting The Dose Right Is Tricky

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Health officials say the number of confirmed cases of measles in western Washington has grown to at least 30, with nine more cases suspected. Clark County Public Health said on Jan. 25 that 29 of the cases were in southwest Washington with one confirmed case in King County, which is home to Seattle. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

In A Measles Outbreak, Demand For Vaccine Spikes

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Ariel Davis for NPR

School Shooters: What's Their Path To Violence?

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Measles is a highly contagious illness that can cause serious health problems, including brain damage, deafness and, in rare cases, death. Vaccination can prevent measles infections. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Defying Parents, A Teen Decides To Get Vaccinated

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Amber Gorrow and her daughter, Eleanor, 3, pick out a show to watch after Eleanor's nap at their home in Vancouver, Wash., on Wednesday. Eleanor has gotten her first measles vaccine, but Gorrow's son, Leon, 8 weeks, is still too young to be immunized. Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images hide caption

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Alisha Jucevic/Getty Images

Measles Cases Mount In Pacific Northwest Outbreak

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Republican lawmaker Allen Christensen is pushing a bill in the Utah Senate that would shrink the Medicaid expansion his state's voters approved. "They are not obligated to balance the budget," he argues. "We are." Cory Dinter/KUER hide caption

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Cory Dinter/KUER

Utah Voters Approved Medicaid Expansion, But State Lawmakers Are Balking

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Dieter Egli, a developmental biologist at Columbia University, and Katherine Palmerola examine a newly fertilized egg injected with a CRISPR editing tool. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos

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Frank Lettiere's eyebrows and eyelashes froze after his walk along Lake Michigan's Chicago shoreline Wednesday. Frostbite warnings were issued for parts of the U.S. Midwest as temperatures plunged. Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

Medical Effects Of Extreme Cold: Why It Hurts And How To Stay Safe

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A measles outbreak in Washington state has triggered a state of emergency. In Clark County, where 35 cases have been reported, 31 were not immunized. Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtney Perry for The Washington Post/Getty Images

Children of Mexican immigrants wait to receive a free health checkup inside a mobile clinic at the Mexican Consulate in Denver, Colo., in 2009. The Trump administration wants to ratchet up scrutiny of the use of social services by immigrants. That's already led some worried parents to avoid family health care. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Fear Of Deportation Or Green Card Denial Deters Some Parents From Getting Kids Care

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The moms of newborn Finnish babies are given government-issued baby boxes—stocked with clothes, bedding and toys — and also doubling as a makeshift crib. The group Finnwatch wanted to know who manufactured the goods. Razvan Ciuca/Getty Images hide caption

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Razvan Ciuca/Getty Images

Juul Labs, the maker of e-cigarettes popular with young, has come under fire from health officials. Since the spring of 2018 the company has been lobbying the federal government. Gabby Jones/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabby Jones/Getty Images

Sabrina Rubich and her 9-month-old son, Kenny, shop for milk and bananas using their newly issued SNAP benefits. Nick Mott/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nick Mott/Montana Public Radio

Food Assistance Payments Came Early But Have To Last Until March

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Lisa Abramson holds her firstborn child, Lucy, in 2014. A few weeks after Lucy's birth, Abramson began feeling confused and then started developing delusions — symptoms of postpartum psychosis. Courtesy of Claire Mulkey hide caption

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Courtesy of Claire Mulkey

She Wanted To Be The Perfect Mom, Then Landed In A Psychiatric Unit

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