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Children's Health

Vintage and new items from discount stores may contain lead and can be especially dangerous for children, who often put their hands in their mouths after touching anything within reach. Brian Munoz and Samantha Horton/Midwest Newsroom hide caption

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Brian Munoz and Samantha Horton/Midwest Newsroom
Triangle Square Books for Young Readers/Seven Stories Press

How one author is aspiring to make sex education more relatable for today's kids

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DELRAY, FL - MAY 23, 2022: (L-R) Alexandra Iriarte, Elizabeth George, Janaya Stephens, Paris Jackson, Mario Guillaume and Keanna Tyson during a group session in their grief support group also knows as Steve's Club held during school hours at Atlantic High School in Delray Beach, Florida on May 23, 2022. Saul Martinez for NPR hide caption

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Saul Martinez for NPR

Losing a parent can derail teens' lives. A high school grief club aims to help

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From left to right: Alice Paredes, Sriya Chippalthurty, Liliana Talino and Natalia Perez Morales are Girl Up "teen advisers" who give up their hobbies to help disadvantaged girls and women in their communities. Girl Up hide caption

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Girl Up

Kids on the shoulder of adults hold signs during an abortions rights rally, Saturday, May 14, 2022, in Chicago. Demonstrators are rallying from coast to coast in the face of an anticipated Supreme Court decision that could overturn women's right to an abortion. (AP Photo/Matt Marton) Matt Marton/AP hide caption

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Matt Marton/AP

How To Talk To Kids About Abortion

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An image provided by the Environmental Protection Agency shows examples of a lead pipe, left, a corroded steel pipe, center, and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. The EPA is only now requiring water systems to take stock of their lead pipes, decades after new ones were banned. Environmental Protection Agency hide caption

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Environmental Protection Agency

Ana Elsy Ramirez Diaz holds her baby as he is seen by Dr. Margaret-Anne Fernandez during a checkup visit at INOVA Cares Clinic for Children in Falls Church, Va. A portion of the clinic's patients are insured through the Children's Health Insurance Program. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Millions of kids qualify for Medicaid. Biden funds outreach to boost enrollment

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Children in Venezuela get toys as a reward for taking vaccines for polio, rubella and influenza. Worldwide vaccination rates have been on a downward plunge. Ariana Cubillos/AP Photo hide caption

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Ariana Cubillos/AP Photo

A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines are now available for children as young as 6 months old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Your Vaccine Questions Answered

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A pediatric neurosurgeon reflects on his intense job, and the post-Roe landscape

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Fourth-grader Lucy Kramer (foreground) does schoolwork at her home, as her mother, Daisley, helps her younger sister, Meg, who is in kindergarten, in 2020 in San Anselmo, Calif. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Raising kids is 'Essential Labor.' It's also lonely, exhausting and expensive

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Brit Oliphant connected with her fourth-grade student, Seth Snyder through skateboarding. Brit was shocked to find out Seth was so passionate about skating but didn't have a skateboard of his own. She started an organization, Boards 4 Buddies, to change that. Nic Hibdige hide caption

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Nic Hibdige

A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., last November. Vaccines will soon be available for children as young as 6 months old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for children under 5 is produced in Puurs, Belgium, in May. U.S. regulators on Friday authorized the first COVID-19 shots for infants and preschoolers, paving the way for vaccinations to begin next week. Pfizer via AP hide caption

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Pfizer via AP

A dozen students at Sitʼ Eeti Shaanáx̱ Glacier Valley Elementary School in Juneau, Alaska, ingested floor sealant during breakfast on Tuesday, believing it was milk. At least one student sought medical attention at a hospital. Ben Hohenstatt/AP hide caption

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Ben Hohenstatt/AP