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Children's Health

Some insurers using this new payment model offer a single fee to one OB-GYN or medical practice, which then uses part of that money to cover the hospital care involved in labor and delivery. Other insurers opt to cut a separate contract with the hospital. Adene Sanchez/Getty Images hide caption

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Adene Sanchez/Getty Images

Ric Peralta and his wife Lisa are both able to check Ric's blood sugar levels at any time, using the Dexcom app and an arm patch that measures the levels and sends the information wirelessly. Allison Zaucha for NPR hide caption

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Allison Zaucha for NPR

It's Not Just Insulin: Diabetes Patients Struggle To Get Crucial Supplies

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In Mumbai, some prosperous neighborhoods sit alongside slums. This year's Gates report on progress toward eliminating poverty notes that there is vast inequality not only between nations, but within many of them. @johnny_miller_photography hide caption

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@johnny_miller_photography

A survey of women ages 18 to 44 found that for an estimated 3.3 million women in that age group, were raped before they ever had a sexual encounter. Researchers say if the numbers included all women they'd be much higher. Aneta Pucia / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Aneta Pucia / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Bridget Desmukes (center) and her husband, Jeffrey, love having a big, active family. "The kids are always climbing on things, flipping all the time — it's not dull," she says, laughing. Because Desmukes had developed preeclampsia in a previous pregnancy, her OB-GYN recommended low-dose aspirin at her first prenatal appointment this past spring. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

A Daily Baby Aspirin Could Help Many Pregnancies And Save Lives

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An FDA committee voted to approve Palforzia, a new treatment for peanut allergy. The treatment is a form of oral immunotherapy intended to desensitize the immune system to peanuts. Lauri Patterson/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

President Trump speaks to the press with first lady Melania Trump and Acting Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Norman Sharpless (left) and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in the Oval Office at the White House on Wednesday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

FDA To Banish Flavored E-Cigarettes To Combat Youth Vaping

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Millions of homes built before 1978 still contain lead-based paint. A report published Monday finds the Environmental Protection Agency is not adequately enforcing laws meant to protect children from lead-laden paint flakes and dust. Stew Milne/AP hide caption

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Stew Milne/AP

Researchers surveyed people about their happy childhood memories and found that those who had more were much less likely to experience depression later in life. IvanJekic/Getty Images hide caption

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IvanJekic/Getty Images

Positive Childhood Experiences May Buffer Against Health Effects Of Adverse Ones

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Joe Bay (center), coach of a New York City "Bootcamp for New Dads," instructs Adewale Oshodi (left) and George Pasco in how to cradle an infant for best soothing. Jason LeCras for NPR hide caption

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Jason LeCras for NPR

UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access. KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

How Should Scientists' Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

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The New York State Department of Health said Thursday that it is looking at vitamin E acetate as a potential cause of severe pulmonary illness cases in the state that have been associated with vaping. Daniel Becerril/Reuters hide caption

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Daniel Becerril/Reuters

A child leaves for school in a village in India. Last November, the Indian government announced new rules limiting the weight of school bags depending on a child's age. But the rules are not always enforced. Punit Paranjpe /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe /AFP/Getty Images

You Think Your Kid's School Backpack Is Heavy? See What's Going On In India!

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Researchers in the U.K. say a teen has suffered vision loss after years of eating a highly limited diet consisting of snacking on Pringles potato chips, as well as French fries, white bread and some processed pork products. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Blind From A Bad Diet? Teen Who Ate Mostly Potato Chips And Fries Lost His Sight

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President Trump talked about expanding health coverage options for small businesses in a Rose Garden gathering at the White House in June. Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has written a children's book called Just Ask! inspired by her desire to help kids embrace diversity. "If you don't know why someone's doing something, just ask them," she says. "Don't assume the worst in people." Rafael López/Philomel Books hide caption

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Rafael López/Philomel Books

'Just Ask!' Says Sonia Sotomayor. She Knows What It's Like To Feel Different

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A paramedic takes a blood sample from a baby for an HIV test in Larkana, Pakistan, on May 9. The government has been offering screenings in response to an HIV outbreak. Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images