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Children's Health

A paramedic takes a blood sample from a baby for a HIV test in Larkana, Pakistan, on May 9. The government is offering screenings in the wake of an HIV outbreak. Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum /AFP/Getty Images

An analysis of air quality and childhood asthma in Los Angeles found that kids' health improved when smog declined. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

When LA's Air Got Better, Kids' Asthma Cases Dropped

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Band-aid at the ready, Sara McRae, a medical assistant at Unity Health Care, heads in to vaccinate a pediatric patient. Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simmons-Duffin/NPR

The Other Reasons Kids Aren't Getting Vaccinations: Poverty And Health Care Access

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An employee of the District of Columbia Housing Authority walks on the grounds of a public housing complex called Richardson Dwellings in Northeast Washington, D.C. The Trump administration wants to eliminate the federal fund now used to repair public housing in favor of attracting more private investment to repair and replace it. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Trump Administration Wants To Cut Funding For Public Housing Repairs

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Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children's Hospital, uses the experimental smartphone app and a paper funnel to check his daughter's ear. Dennis Wise/University of Washington hide caption

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Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Signs advertising free measles vaccines and providing information about measles are displayed at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. The county in New York City's northern suburbs has had more than 200 measles cases since last fall. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Copperhead snakes are one of the four kinds of venomous snakes in the United States. kristianbell/RooM RF/Getty Images hide caption

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kristianbell/RooM RF/Getty Images

How You (And Your Dog) Can Avoid Snake Bites — And What To Do If You Get Bitten

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Sayeed Rehman, a 5-year-old Afghan boy, was delighted to get a new prosthetic leg that fits his growing body. His leg was amputated after he was caught in crossfire as a baby. Ruchi Kumar for NPR hide caption

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Ruchi Kumar for NPR

Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway (left), now 17, with her mother Joanne Carnell-Holdaway. Isabelle has a dangerous infection that is being treated with a cocktail of genetically modified viruses. Courtesy of Jo Holdaway hide caption

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Courtesy of Jo Holdaway

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

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Kristan Kerr says she watched her daughter grow up while she was in prison. "Every visit, I'd say you're getting big, you've grown," Kerr says. "I just watched her grow all the way up." Christopher Connelly/KERA hide caption

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Christopher Connelly/KERA

'They Love Their Kids': Texas Lawmakers Want To Send Fewer Moms To Prison

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Hundreds of people rally in March at the Oregon State Capitol in Salem, protesting a proposal to tighten school vaccine requirements Similar rallies were held in April. Sarah Zimmerman/AP hide caption

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Sarah Zimmerman/AP

Amid Measles Outbreaks, States Consider Revoking Religious Vaccine Exemptions

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At a Feb. 21, 2018, Philippine Senate hearing in Manila on deaths linked to the dengue vaccine, families brought photos of children who had been vaccinated. Noel Celis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis /AFP/Getty Images

Rush To Produce, Sell Vaccine Put Kids In Philippines At Risk

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Clarisa Corber at work at a Topeka, Kan., insurance agency. Corber and her husband — who have three kids, a health plan and $15,000 in medical debt — were profiled in a recent Los Angeles Times investigation into the effects of high-deductible health plans. Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times hide caption

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Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times

Employees Start To Feel The Squeeze Of High-Deductible Health Plans

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Measles used to be a common childhood disease, but after an effective vaccine was developed, the disease was declared eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. This year's outbreaks, however, put that status in jeopardy. solidcolours/Getty Images hide caption

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A nurse prepares a syringe for a measles vaccination at a pediatric clinic in Kiev, Ukraine. The country had 72,408 measles cases in the year from March 2018 to February 2019 — the highest number for any country during that period. Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Measles Outbreaks Are Driven By A Global Surge In The Virus

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Katherine Langford arrives at a 13 Reasons Why event in June 2018 in Los Angeles. Langford plays a young woman who took her own life. Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP hide caption

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Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

MMR — the modern combination vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella — provides stronger, longer-lasting protection against measles than the stand-alone measles vaccine typically given in the U.S. in the early 1960s. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too

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The Brady Bunch, circa 1970, with oldest sister Marcia seated in front. In one episode of the show from 1969, the sisters and brothers all stay home from school with measles. ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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ABC Photo Archives/Getty Images

'Brady Bunch' Episode Fuels Campaigns Against Vaccines — And Marcia's Miffed

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Seventh-grade teachers Rita Ibrahim John, left, and Anotinia Marquez Bero, right, must share a single room to teach their two classes. Cyclone Idai destroyed 32 classrooms at Eduardo Mondlane Primary Completion School in Mozambique. Tendai Marima for NPR hide caption

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Tendai Marima for NPR