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Children's Health

Aaron Hunter doing physical therapy at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital's outpatient center in Sarasota on Oct. 12, 2023. After getting shot in the head last June, Aaron struggled with weakness and balance on the left side of his body. He spent months in physical therapy before being discharged in February. Stephanie Colombini/WUSF hide caption

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Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

Guns are killing more U.S. children. Shooting survivors can face lifelong challenges

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Winston Hall, 9, needs growth hormone to manage symptoms of Prader-Willi syndrome, a genetic condition. A shortage of the medicine has contributed to behavioral issues that led him to be sent home from school. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

Persistent shortage of growth hormone frustrates parents and clinicians

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So far in 2024, more than 80% of measles cases involved people who were unvaccinated or whose vaccination status was unknown, according to CDC data. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Many young people who started vaping nicotine as teens several years ago haven't quit the habit, data show. Daisy-Daisy/Getty Images hide caption

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Daisy-Daisy/Getty Images

Young adults who started vaping as teens still can't shake the habit

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Marine Buffard for NPR

Parents, it's time to talk to your child about vaping

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Early in life, Sam (left) and John were much more similar than they may seem today. "They both did not wave, they didn't respond to their name, they both had a lot of repetitive movements," says their mother, Kim Leaird. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

These identical twins both grew up with autism, but took very different paths

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To ensure your baby is ready to eat solid food, check for these developmental markers: good head control, the ability to sit upright with minimal support, loss of the tongue thrust reflex and an interest in food. Lindsey Balbierz for NPR hide caption

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Lindsey Balbierz for NPR

A nervous parent's guide to starting your baby on solid foods

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Many cities have older lead service lines connecting homes to the water system. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Lead in the drinking water is still a problem in the U.S. — especially in Chicago

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Amid growing concern about children's use of social media, the United Kingdom implemented rules designed to keep kids safer and limit their screen time. The U.S. is weighing similar legislation. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Want to stop needle phobia in adults? Make shots less painful for kids

According to the CDC, about one in four adults has a fear of needles. Many of those people say the phobia started when they were kids. For some people, the fear of needles is strong enough that they avoid getting important treatments, vaccines or tests. That poses a serious problem for public health. Researchers have helped develop a five step plan to help prevent what they call "needless pain" for kids getting injections or their blood drawn. Guest host Tom Dreisbach talks with Dr. Stefan Friedrichsdorf of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals, who works with a team to implement the plan at his own hospital. Friedrichsdorf told us some of the most important research on eliminating pain has come from researchers in Canada. Learn more about their work here.

Want to stop needle phobia in adults? Make shots less painful for kids

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When relaying the difficult news of a cancer diagnosis to kids, it's important to give them time to process the information, says Elizabeth Farrell, a clinical social worker at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Mary Long/Getty Images hide caption

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Palestinian people with empty bowls wait for food at a donation point in Rafah. A report out this week shows widespread hunger and malnutrition in Gaza but stopped short of declaring it a "famine." Abed Rahim Khatib/Anadolu via Getty Images hide caption

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Abed Rahim Khatib/Anadolu via Getty Images

Melissa Wyaco supervises about two dozen public health nurses who search for patients across the Navajo Nation who have tested positive for or have been exposed to syphilis. Navajo Area Indian Health Services hide caption

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Navajo Area Indian Health Services
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Isabela Oside, 45, washes hands of her daughter Faith, 3, who completed doses through the worlds first malaria vaccine. Malaria is one of the preventable diseases that contributes to worldwide child mortality. Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

Why a new report on child mortality is historic, encouraging — and grim

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A digital illustration of a circle of hands extending from the edge of the image, each holding a sheet of paper. The papers overlap in the center and, like a puzzle, come together to reveal a drawing of a handgun. Oona Tempest/KFF Health News hide caption

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Oona Tempest/KFF Health News

A dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. When an unvaccinated person is exposed to measles, public health guidance if for them to get vaccinated within three days. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's response to measles outbreak troubles public health experts

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A 7-month-old child with diarrhea lies in a bed at a hospital in India. Oral rehydration salts are a cheap and effective treatment but are underused. A new study aims to find out why. Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images hide caption

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Ritesh Shukla/Getty Images