Children's Health NPR reports on children's health and medical news including health insurance, new treatments for diseases, and child product safety recalls. Subscribe to the RSS feed.

Kelly Kuhns's 2-year-old son Oliver was born with Down syndrome. She says that she was shocked when a prenatal test revealed a Trisomy 21 mutation. But, she says, "he's still a baby. He's still worthy of a life just like everybody else." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Down Syndrome Families Divided Over Abortion Ban

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

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Michele Comisky of Vienna, Va., enrolled her 8-year-old son, Jackson, in a study to test the value of probiotics in preventing the gut distress often experienced when taking antibiotics. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics?

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About one child a month dies from being entangled in cords from blinds and shades, a study finds. Efforts are underway to get corded blinds off the market, but many will remain in homes. Joanne Dugan/Getty Images hide caption

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Joanne Dugan/Getty Images

Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

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A girl is vaccinated against dengue as part of a public immunization program for children in the Philippines. The program was suspended after the company raised safety concerns about the vaccination. Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images hide caption

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Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images

A JUUL e-cigarette for sale at Fast Eddie's Smoke Shop in Boston. The sleek devices are easy to conceal, which makes them popular with teenagers. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Trump's Claim That GOP Tax Bill Would Hurt The Wealthy Continues To Be Challenged

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Peter Saltonstall, president of the National Organization of Rare Disorders, speaks at a rally Tuesday in support of tax credits for companies that develop drugs for rare diseases. Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN hide caption

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Sarah Jane Tribble/KHN
Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

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Amid reports of disturbing kid-oriented content and pedophilic comments on its site, YouTube says it is increasing enforcement of guidelines relating to content featuring or targeting children. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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d3sign/Getty Images

If you're regularly checking your phone at night in a dark room, you're probably tricking your body into thinking it's still daytime. Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Artur Debat/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Apps Can Cut Blue Light From Devices, But Do They Help You Sleep?

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Tatiana Curran, right, and her boyfriend Jake Cowen-Whitman say their three-year relationship is an anomaly amongst their peers. But they readily concede that even they have serious issues around intimacy. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Lessons In Love For Generation Snapchat

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A Bangladeshi child works in a brick-breaking yard in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The broken bricks are mixed in with concrete. Typically working barefoot and with rough utensils, a child worker earns less than $2 a day. Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Mehedi Hasan/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Sam Kass speaks at TED Talks Live - Education Revolution. Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED hide caption

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Ryan Lash/Ryan Lash/TED

Sam Kass: Can Free Breakfast Improve Learning?

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