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Victoria gave birth to her daughter Lili while in treatment for opioid dependency. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

Babies Born Dependent On Opioids Need Touch, Not Tech

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When a teen's symptoms of depression improve as a result of treatment, it's more likely that their parent's mood lifts, too, new research shows. Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Treating Teen Depression Might Improve Mental Health Of Parents, Too

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The Children's Village has several grassy areas where kids can play soccer and other sports. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR

An Orphanage That Doesn't Seem Like An Orphanage

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Inducing labor at 39 weeks may involve IV medications and continuous fetal monitoring. But if the pregnancy is otherwise uncomplicated, mother and baby can do just fine, the latest evidence suggests. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not?

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Mother Daniele Santos holds her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, on May 30, 2016, in Recife, Brazil. Researchers are now learning that Zika's effects can appear up to a year after birth. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Babies Who Seem Fine At Birth May Have Zika-Related Problems Later, Study Finds

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Evelyn Nussembaum and her son Sam Vogelstein pick up a six month supply of Epidiolex from the experimental pharmacy at UCSF. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

How One Boy's Fight With Epilepsy Led To The First Marijuana-Derived Pharmaceutical

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In the mountain town of Juyaya, Puerto Rico, last October, children watched as U.S. Army helicopters brought a team of physicians to assess the medical needs of the local hospital and residents. Going forward, health economists say, the U.S. territory will need continued federal help to deal with its overwhelming Medicaid expenses. Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

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UCLA
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More Screen Time For Teens Linked To ADHD Symptoms

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Marcus Butt / Ikon/Getty Images

Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too

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Rohingya children carrying firewood into the Kutupalong camp in Bangladesh. Refugees have stripped almost all the area vegetation to use in cooking fires. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

Juan Lopez Aguilar (left), a Maya man who fled violence in Guatemala three years ago, tells Dr. Nick Nelson he fears returning to the land of his birth. "There are a lot of gangs," he tells the doctor. "They want to kill people in my community." Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Medical Clinics That Treat Refugees Help Determine The Case For Asylum

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When ticks come into contact with clothing sprayed with permethrin, research shows, they quickly become incapacitated and are unable to bite. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

To Repel Ticks, Try Spraying Your Clothes With A Pesticide That Mimics Mums

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Nailah Winkfield (left) and Omari Sealey, the mother and uncle of Jahi McMath, listen to doctors speak during a news conference in San Francisco in 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP