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Children's Health

Democratic presidential candidates former Vice President Joe Biden (left), Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg (right) debate different ways to expand health coverage in America. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Justin Ruben of ParentsTogether speaks on Thursday at a press conference organized to deliver 1.5 million petitions to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The petitions are protesting proposed changes to the food stamps program that would also affect the free school lunch program. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Parents Together hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Parents Together

Getting a handle on evolving vape culture means exploring the complex realm of subspecialists: "cloud chasers," "coil builders" and other people who identify as vape modders. Kiszon Pascal/Getty Images hide caption

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Kiszon Pascal/Getty Images

Girls carry containers of water filled from the local communal tap Zimbabwe, which is in the grip of a nationwide drought that has been linked to climate change. Cynthia R. Matonhodze/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Cynthia R. Matonhodze/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Why Climate Change Poses A Particular Threat To Child Health

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To deal with chronic pain, Pamela Bobb's morning routine now includes stretching and meditation at home in Fairfield Glade, Tenn. Bobb says this mind-body awareness intervention has greatly reduced the amount of painkiller she needs. Jessica Tezak for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Tezak for NPR

Meditation Reduced The Opioid Dose She Needs To Ease Chronic Pain By 75%

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Authorities perform an active shooter drill at Park High School on April 27, 2018 in Livingston, Mont. Some experts question the methods of active shooter drills. William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

Experts Worry Active Shooter Drills In Schools Could Be Traumatic For Students

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People cover their faces with masks to avoid thick smog in New Delhi on Nov. 5. People living there have complained about respiratory problems. Raj K Raj/Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

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Two fourth-graders rock side to side while doing math equations at Charles Pinckney Elementary School's "Brain Room" in Charleston, S.C., in 2015. John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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John McDonnell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

A large study published in late October found that weekly injections of Makena during the latter months of pregnancy "did not decrease recurrent preterm births." Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Lehmann Photography/Getty Images

Controversy Kicks Up Over A Drug Meant To Prevent Premature Birth

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

Diagnostic Gaps: Skin Comes In Many Shades And So Do Rashes

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Kate Clyatt, 28, works seasonally as a ranch hand in southwest Montana, and relies on the state's Medicaid program for health coverage. "Ranching is just not a job with a lot of money in it," Clyatt says. "I don't know at what point I'm going to be able to get off of Medicaid." Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Corin Cates-Carney/Montana Public Radio

Rural Seasonal Workers Worry About Montana Medicaid's Work Requirements

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Colorado estimates that about 15% of the 12 million letters it sends to beneficiaries of public assistance programs each year are returned unopened, left to pile up in county offices like this one in Colorado Springs. That amounts to about 1.8 million pieces of undelivered mail each year statewide. Markian Hawryluk/KHN hide caption

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Markian Hawryluk/KHN

Outside of risks from the fire's heat — and any health risks related to a long-term power outage — the main health concern in wildfire conditions is smoke, which produces particulate matter that can penetrate deep into the lungs, increasing the risk of respiratory diseases and asthma, as well as heart problems. Anna Maria Barry-Jester/KHN hide caption

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Anna Maria Barry-Jester/KHN

Two women sit, with their faces covered, at a drug treatment center in Kabul, Afghanistan. Musadeq Sadeq/AP hide caption

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Musadeq Sadeq/AP

Women And Children Are The Emerging Face Of Drug Addiction In Afghanistan

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Nathaly Sweeney, a neonatologist at Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego and researcher with Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine, attends to a young patient in the hospital's neonatal intensive care unit. Jenny Siegwart/Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine hide caption

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Jenny Siegwart/Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine

Fast DNA Sequencing Can Offer Diagnostic Clues When Newborns Need Intensive Care

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