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The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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Denise and Richard Victor of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., have been missing their grandkids, whom they haven't seen since February. Before the pandemic, they had regular visits with grandsons (from left) Daren Cosola, Stirling Victor, Davis Victor and Lucas Cosola. Courtesy of the Victor family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Victor family

Justice Buress, 4, hides under a table while demonstrating a drill at Little Explorers Learning Center in St. Louis. Tess Trice, head of the day care program, carries out monthly drills to train the children to get on the floor when they hear gunfire. Carolina Hidalgo/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Carolina Hidalgo/St. Louis Public Radio

Teaching Kids To Hide From Gunfire: Safety Drills At Day Care And At Home

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Feda Almaliti with her son, 15-year-old Muhammed, who has severe autism. "Muhammed is an energetic, loving boy who doesn't understand what's going on right now," she says. Feda Almaliti hide caption

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Feda Almaliti

'He's Incredibly Confused': Parenting A Child With Autism During The Pandemic

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People load their vehicles with boxes of food at a Los Angeles Regional Food Bank earlier this month in Los Angeles. Food banks across the United States are seeing numbers and people they have never seen before amid unprecedented unemployment from the COVID-19 outbreak. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Food Banks Get The Love, But SNAP Does More To Fight Hunger

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Camdyn and Caydance Austin play together at their home in Windsor, Illinois. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media
Daniel Wood/NPR

Traffic Is Way Down Because Of Lockdown, But Air Pollution? Not So Much

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Casa de Salud clinicians, staff and health apprentices socially distance outside their New Mexico clinic. The facility is one of many social safety net clinics that haven't yet received pandemic-related funding and are now on the brink financially. Elizabeth Boyce/Casa de Salud hide caption

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Elizabeth Boyce/Casa de Salud

A newborn baby girl receives treatment for the gun wound in her right leg received during the attack on a maternity clinic in Kabul this week. The gunmen killed her mother. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

Nurses and newborns in Hotel Venice, a facility owned by BioTexCom clinic in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Thursday. Dozens of babies born to surrogate mothers are stranded in Ukraine as the coronavirus restrictions prevent foreign parents from collecting them. Gleb Garanich/Reuters hide caption

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Gleb Garanich/Reuters

Research indicates that smokers and vapers are at increased risk of more serious illness if they get infected with the novel coronavirus. Tegra Stone Nuess/Getty Images hide caption

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Tegra Stone Nuess/Getty Images

A patient with suspected COVID-19 arrives at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn in early April. Even as the risk of big medical bills climbs, many Americans are losing their jobs and health insurance right now. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Coronavirus Reset: How To Get Health Insurance Now

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The serious inflammatory syndrome sending some children and teens to the hospital remains extremely uncommon, doctors say. But if your child spikes a high, persistent fever, and has severe abdominal pain with vomiting that doesn't make them feel better, call your doctor as a precaution. Sally Anscombe/Getty Images hide caption

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Sally Anscombe/Getty Images

Mystery Inflammatory Syndrome In Kids And Teens Likely Linked To COVID-19

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LA Johnson/NPR

When After-School Is Shut Down, Too

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Doctors are urging parents to keep all their child's vaccinations up to date — now, more than ever. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Don't Skip Your Child's Well Check: Delays In Vaccines Could Add Up To Big Problems

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On Sunday, children in Spain will be allowed to go outside for the first time in nearly six weeks. Here, Olimpia, 3 (the photographer's daughter), plays with her toy dog as they wear face masks in Madrid. David Benito/Getty Images hide caption

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David Benito/Getty Images

President Trump's daily briefings on the COVID-19 pandemic have introduced millions of Americans to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Evan Vucci/AP Photo hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP Photo

Long Before COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci 'Changed Medicine In America Forever'

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If one person in the household is sick with COVID-19, everyone else in the home should consider themselves as possibly having an asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic infection, even if they feel fine, doctors say. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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sorbetto/Getty Images