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Chefs Kerry Heffernan and Tom Colicchio pose for a photo at Bearnaise, a Capitol Hill restaurant, on Tuesday before setting out for a day of lobbying lawmakers. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Kris Connor/Getty Images

E-cigarettes work by heating up a fluid that contains the drug nicotine, producing a vapor that users inhale. The devices are most popular among young adults, ages 18 to 24, a federal survey indicates. iStockphoto hide caption

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Most E-Cigarette Users Are Current And Ex-Smokers, Not Newbies

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A young boy talks with Tina Cloer, director of the Children's Bureau, in Indianapolis. The nonprofit shelter takes in children from the state's Department of Child Services when a suitable foster family can't be found. Cloer says the average length of stay at the shelter has increased from two days to 10 in 2015. Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Jake Harper/Side Effects Public Media

Heroin, Opioid Abuse Put Extra Strain On U.S. Foster Care System

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

Next Year Could Mark The End Of Polio

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It may be fine. But do we know for sure? iStockphoto hide caption

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Why Do People Get So Bent Out Of Shape About Drinking While Pregnant?

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'East Los High' Serves Up Sex Ed With Its Teen Drama

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Joseph Daniel Fiedler for NPR

Fetal Cells May Protect Mom From Disease Long After The Baby's Born

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Who's ahead in the baby tally these days — boys or girls? Newborns are ready to be counted in a Florida hospital. JOHN STANMEYER/National Geographic hide caption

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JOHN STANMEYER/National Geographic

A woman breast-feeds her child as she waits to donate milk to a milk bank in Lima. The donations are used for babies whose mothers can't provide breast milk. Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ernesto Benavides /AFP/Getty Images

Kids and parents often shy away from talking about their struggles at the doctor's office. But the American Academy of Pediatrics is now urging its members to screen kids for food insecurity during well-child visits. iStockphoto hide caption

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Are You Hungry? Pediatricians Add A New Question During Checkups

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While schools are spending more on local food, it still makes up only a small portion of the average school meal. Here, a chicken salad at the cafeteria at Draper Middle School in Rotterdam, N.Y., in 2012. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

As Schools Buy More Local Food, Kids Throw Less Food In The Trash

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Researchers have used MRI scanners to learn that preemies are born with weak connections in some critical brain networks. iStockphoto hide caption

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Weak Brain Connections May Link Premature Birth And Later Disorders

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